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Assessing and exploring the differences and similarities between the tabloid and broadsheet formats.

Extracts from this essay...

Introduction

Module Media Studies Module leader Esther Windsor Candidate # 10226821 Candidate name Michael Obiozo Essay question # 4 GOODBYE JACKO No final miracle but Jackson Colin quits after 25-medal glory reign bows out with honour The Sun headline The Guardian headline Introduction I will be assessing and exploring the differences and similarities between the tabloid and broadsheet formats that are The Sun (appendicle 1) and The Guardian (appendicle 2), (sport supplement), on the coverage of Colin Jackson's exit from athletic competition on the final day at the World Indoor Championship at Birmingham. To help discover what factors will determine how much news coverage of this story will go into these two media formats, there is a list of aims that have been set below to show how I intend on gaining relevant information to aid the construction of the above question. Aims * Attach relevance to the study of the 12 suggested news values by Galtang and Ruge that effect editorial decisions in the selecting and construction a news page * Analyse the semiotics behind the text in the two formats and find out what messages are intended to reach the readership. * To apply and evaluate the relevant theories and ideologies that help make sense of the process of page making (layout and design) for a particular readership including the behavioral approach and how they are relevant to tabloids and broadsheet press. Comparing the two formats the coverage of this story seem to have had both devoted substantial coverage for the day, in contrast to other stories excluding the topic of the 2nd Gulf war.

Middle

Another notion that we can see to be relevant within this story only seems to tie in with The Sun newspapers format and that is negativity (bad news is good news) as a news value as the second sentence tries to do by adding a 'but' after commending the athlete on an exception career as written "But Colin Jackson's dream of finishing a World Indoor Champion in front of a Birmingham crowd was not to be", implying that his high aspirations were crushed so not particularly good news. One of the reasons why I purchased both news formats for this exploration into what makes an event newsworthy was because I knew this story of Colin Jackson's (final race had to be covered as this event was too good to miss out on and even I knew that the World indoor athletic championships would stage his final run, as well as many others. This would coincide with the notion known as consonance which would explain this as would this quote for a definition for this ideological news value, "The predictability of, or desire for, an event. If the media expect something to happen, then it will." (Hartley, John 1982, p77). The name Colin Jackson in its self is a name that is well known and according to the notion posed by Galtang and Ruge this would class him as an elite person and would in theory make the story far more enjoyable for a reader than if the sports person was unknown.

Conclusion

editorial divisions about this story seems to be close to universal in topic, showing that the closer we are to major home news stories the lesser the diversity of the news judgement. Plus the similarities out weigh the differences, as this event has been defined as British or 'wedom' showing a relatively high degree of consensus on this story. Also this approach of thinking on the journalists behalf is often referred to as the 'Mass Society thesis', which has little to do with the study of 'real' audiences focusing on a more quantitative approach in measurement when a more qualitative view such as the behaviorist theoretical approach in analyzing readership which may prove to be more informative in construction when analyzing what makes an event newsworthy, such as the study of B.F. Skinner. As well as being a theoretical approach to assessing the news values of these dailies, we can also assume the following about the story covered, "representations of national identity / unspoken assumptions they hold about their readers' sense of 'patriotism'" (Allan, Stuart. (2002) Issues in Cultural and Media Studies: News Culture Chapter 7, p179-180). In conclusion to the posed question "Analyse what makes an event newsworthy" in short the selection and editorial decision of news events is not a reflex action to ideologies and theories laid out by academics in this field, but is the socially determined construction of reality and suggests that journalistic choices are intentional and not just the effects of certain so called news values. Although they may help to gain an idea of structure.

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