• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7

Compare the ways in which Pride & Prejudice has been adapted for the screen, referring to three scenes in your answer

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Media Coursework Compare the ways in which Pride & Prejudice has been adapted for the screen, referring to three scenes in your answer Pride and Prejudice is a 19th century novel written by Jane Austen. As it is a popular novel it has been remade for television and film several times. In this essay two media adaptations are being analysed. The 1995 BBC classic drama of pride and Prejudice and a 2004 Bollywood version renamed Bride and Prejudice. The BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice is a period drama and has been made using the books storyline and text very closely whereas the Bollywood adaptation has only faithfully adhered to the storyline and parts have been changed to attract a modern audience. In addition to storyline, and text not changed in the BBC adaptation, costume, props and language are all in keeping with the 19th century way of life. However the Bollywood adaptation uses costume, props and language from the Indian culture, this has up dated the film and also keeps with the storyline of the book. Both adaptations have very different audiences they are trying to attract. Pride and Prejudice aims for older and more mature people, an audience who are interested in period dramas and may have read the book. The Bollywood film, however is aimed at younger audiences who may have not heard of Pride and Prejudice nor read the book. It has been changed into a romantic comedy; "romcom" rather than a more serious look at the book. The use of the Indian culture and view on marriages is a contrast to the views in the 19th century. In both productions the main theme is marriage but they use different methods to represent it. The BBC version shows how relationships and marriage were in the 19th century, in contrast to this how many of the restrictions placed in the 19th century are still in practise in the Indian culture today, however, modernizes the story. ...read more.

Middle

Another adaptation that has been made is the costume. Mr Collins wears formal dress which is the clothes which would be worn in the 19th century. The style of his clothes are also a representation of him, he is a clergyman and a very plain man. Mr Kholi's clothes are stylish, bold and very up to date, and this represents his character very well. Mr Kholi is self-confident, loud man and does not realise often what he is saying or how he offends people, the clothes also represent his break away from the Indian culture and living in America. As well as the costumes reflecting their characters the audience can also see what the characters are like. In the BBC adaptation Mr Collins is a religious and traditional man, Mr Kholi however has turned his back on his Indian culture and moved to America for a better life. There are some parts of the Mr Collins character that are the same in the Bollywood adaptation in the same way as the BBC adaptation. Both Mr Collins and Mr Kholi look down to the Bennets/Bakshis, they think they are better than them. In Mr Collins' case this is because he will inherit the Bennets estate and Mr Kholi's because he has more money and a better life than the Bakshi's, they are both unpleasant characters. The Bollywood adaptation has also changed the conversation of Mr Kholi compared to Mr Collins. When Mr Collins arrives he uses his language to make himself look smart, he uses substantial and intelligent words, which are incorrect. Alternatively Mr Kholi brags about his wealth and lifestyle, he also has inappropriate conversations and is very out spoken. Greetings in the two adaptations are also different too, Mr Collins greets people formally and there is no touching or hugging, this reflects the social etiquette of the 19th century instead of the informal hugs Mr Kholi gives. ...read more.

Conclusion

This has been changed for the Bollywood adaptation for the happy ending that happens in Bollywood films, it would not be entirely like a Bollywood film if Lucky ended up with the bad man and not be happy. In conclusion the BBC and Bollywood adaptations of Pride and Prejudice have been made very differently. The title of the Bollywood adaptation has been changed to Bride and Prejudice to reflect the difference in the Indian culture, the main personality of the characters have stayed the same in both adaptations, costumes have been changed to reflect the difference in cultures and times yet kept so the characters traits can be seen, the contrast in settings shows the different countries and a different way in life and the change in the storyline reflects the difference in times, countries and culture. The setting of the story has been changed as the film wants to show the restrictions on 19th century marriage still coincide with the Indian view on marriages today, the characters traits were kept the same to show how they could be brought into the present day but changed slightly in their costumes, mannerisms and they way people see them. As the characters are represented through their costumes, the wealth of the families is too, the costumes have been changed in the Bollywood adaptation to traditional Indian costumes but they show the contrast to the expensive clothes of the Balraj sister compared to the Bakshi sisters. This is also the same for the Bingley sister and Bennet sisters in the BBC adaptation. I preferred the Bollywood adaptation. This is because it is not as serious as the BBC adaptation; it is more vibrant, colourful and loud. The singing and dancing breaks up the film and the comedy also puts more life into the story. The BBC adaptation is too long and does not keep my attention as much as the other. Another reason why I preferred the Bollywood adaptation was the costumes and new surroundings, the Indian culture is very bold and this made it more enjoyable to watch. Laura Williams 10W1/10ND ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Narrative section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Narrative essays

  1. The dark knight essay

    Lastly Nolan uses another successful effect by turning the camera around. He does this near the end when the Joker is hanging upside-down off a building. The camera is turned so that you see the Joker as if he was standing upright and it looks very strange as his hair

  2. English Language Coursework

    The example from the text is, "artistry so perfect". Listing is also present is Text B. This is in the form of asyndeton. The example f this fro the text is, "Ken Rosewell, Fred..." This is done to compare the player with other players to show how successful he is compared to his opposition.

  1. Both Spirited Away and Pan(TM)s Labyrinth represent the traditional family unit as an important ...

    Kamajii, the boiler man, is conveyed to us as the audience in such a way that we immediately recognise him as very experienced, kindly and possibly wise. Although he is a rather "removed" character in the film, only appearing infrequently, he is only ever welcoming in nature, helping Chihiro at

  2. Discuss the way in which 'Neighbours' by Tim Winton and 'Stolen Car' by Archie ...

    'Where is the soil that spawned their ancestors? Only bitumen and cement here now.' Johnny is asking him self what is the purpose of these people, what contribution do they make, they have no real identity. 'They are like the leaves of yesterday's yellowed newspaper, with yesterday's news, whirling aimlessly in the dirty streets.'

  1. How does Alfred Hitchcock Shape Audience Expectations in the Opening Scenes of Rear Window?

    The audience is encouraged to disapprove of Jeffries watching people as they feel that he is intruding on a very private scene that nobody should be seeing, and Miss Lonelyhearts would be very upset if she thought someone else had watched her.

  2. Language investigation on two magazines, 'Top gear' and 'classic cars'

    The next page tells the reader what the occasion is all about, the race, the route, the guy in the picture with a funny wig, marks the occasion, as does the wine bottle and the sports car, it represents what the race it hold and advertises it for other people to get involved, the next year.

  1. How has James Cameron adapted and presented the true story of the Titanic?

    The dramatic irony technique is used here because the audience know the Titanic will sink and this touches the audiences' emotions, since they can see how many people are aboard the ship and soon their lives will unknowingly be in danger.

  2. Explore the ways Shrek and the Practical Princess subvert Stereotypes!

    Bedelia was going to be taken away from an evil lord called Lord Quarp so he could marry the princess and be the next King to take place on the throne. He could only do this when he marries a princess.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work