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Different types of news reporting on Steven Regrave and his fifth Gold medal win.

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Introduction

For my media coursework I will be looking at different types of news reporting on Steven Regrave and his fifth Gold medal win. The papers I will be looking are the observers and The Daily Mirror. I will follow the coverage of the British coxless fours triumph in the rowing event final in Sydney 2000. Also I will be looking at the ways Television and Internet are you used for a good reason at showing the news. I will compare each and find out which is the best resource for the news. Newspapers Tabloid The tabloid newspaper I shall be covering is the Daily Mirror. The Daily mirror is a very simple newspaper to pick up and read. ...read more.

Middle

The Daily Mirror always uses catchy clever witty puns, which often make people laugh and grin. These puns attract people to reads the paper as it gives a sort of comic relief from possible grim news. The Daily Mirror uses a lot of subtitles and quotes between large pieces of text, which breaks up large reading which makes the tabloid so easy for quick and simple reading for lets say the average man. What possibly makes the papers easy to read its basic Layout, which contains many pictures of the day's news. Sydney 2000 was no different. Many different pictures showed all events particuly English athletes competing especially Steven Redgrave going for his fifth gold medal. ...read more.

Conclusion

Language is simple quick and short to read Broadsheet Broadsheet newspapers such as the Observer are, almost the complete opposite of Tabloid newspapers such as the daily mirror. For a start the front main page does not consist of bright colours or large coloured words across the whole page. The first thing noticeable about a front page of a broadsheet is the title every single time is normaly very serious which gives an impression that the story being covered will have immense detail, which makes people who are interested in the story a good idea what to expect. Also there are very few subtitles within the text of the story. This makes the contents flow quickly. The layout of a broadsheet is also very much different from a tabloid. For Charlie Evans Media Coursework ...read more.

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