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"Discuss the view that news is produced and manufactured as popular entertainment."

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Introduction

"Discuss the view that news is produced and manufactured as popular entertainment." 'News' has many different meanings by lots of people. It can be interpreted in many ways. We perceive news in the way newspapers and broadcast delivers it across to us. They use special techniques to do this. I believe news is produced and manufactured as popular entertainment. This is what interests readers. The broadsheet and tabloid newspapers have different views and values about the way they present news. News also has to have certain qualities to be called 'newsworthy' and this need to go through several stages of manufacture to get published. News is information the public wants to know. 'Popular entertainment' is stories that are well like by the public. Its true that the more quirky the story, the more the audience will be engaged by it. News is made into entertainment mainly by the tabloids to interest readers, so more people will buy the papers and obviously want to make more money by doing this. ...read more.

Middle

The presentation of a news story all determined the fact that it is produced for entertainment. At this point in the manufacture detailed design and layout are discussed and all of the staff of each department are brought together. Then the final print and photographic layouts are adjusted and negotiated and the style of the paper is fine-tuned. Both tabloids and broadsheets have there own ways of doing this. I have chosen several copies of the Daily Mirror as an example of a tabloid to show the entertainment side and The Guardian as an example of a broadsheet to show real news. Just at a glance at the front pages, The Guardian looks double the height of The Mirror. The Mirror is a lot more colourful and the news titles are bold and large. Often a pun is used to grab the reader's attention, usually one that is mildly humorous, and lead then into the newspaper for the rest of the story. An example of this is in the Mirror (October 10th). ...read more.

Conclusion

In broadsheet papers there is no need for news to be portrayed as entertainment. This is just 'real news'. As an example the same story as I described earlier about Slobodan Milosevic is on the front page of the Guardian. It consists of a serious title, which is an overview of the story. No snappy pun, just, "Milosevic eronies defy Serbia's new ruler". There is no picture either, instead plain, small font, tightly packed text. It follows on to page 2 with exactly the same layout. News is twisted and made bias for entertainment use. There is an extreme amount of pressure to "sell" a story these days. This is why they need to be exaggerated. The tabloids do this very well and this is why such papers as the Sun and Daily Mirror are very successful. On the other hand the broadsheets don't need to do this because they make their money out of advertisements. But, today there is beginning to be less and less of 'real news' because of competition. Therefore I think news is produced and manufactured as popular entertainment. Mainly to interest readers in buying their stories. ...read more.

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