• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How do the newspaper and television channels present the news?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How do the newspaper and television channels present the news? Comment on use of language; fact and opinion; visual images; bias and viewing audience. Newspapers and television channels both present the news by giving different accounts of the same basic stories. Newspapers give different accounts depending on if they are tabloid and Broadsheet, whereas television gives different accounts depending on which channel the viewers decide to watch. To study television and newspapers, there are four channels to look at BBC1, BBC2, ITV1, Channel 4, and there are three newspapers: The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mail, and The Sun. There are also the websites and radio programmes to use. On use of language, the way the newspapers present the news all vary depending on what type of newspaper and what the story is. Tabloid newspapers are looking to gain interest of the reader, so their language might contain gossip and can be very criticising. Broadsheet however has more facts; it is aimed for mature readers, and contains more facts and tries to give a straight report. Using two tabloids and one Broadsheet, the comparison is apparent straight away. The daily mail (Friday 3rd of January 2003) on the second page of the Daily Mail, there is a story all about Madonna and what she is wearing. The language in this report is quite informal with the words, "cool", and "chic". The article does use standard English most of the time, however. ...read more.

Middle

Channel 4 (November 25th 6:00pm) contains facts and opinions. In each report containing politics there is normally a video of a politician with a voice over from a reporter. This can sometime be a stream of short facts on what the politician is saying. The politician can often still be heard-this gives a sense of authenticity. Reporters often end on a statement. An example of this is BBC1 (6:00pm, Monday 25th November.) "They are not giving up." This is about the fire fighters strike and shows a bold fact to close with. Facts and figures can be used to support stories and to show that the reporters know what they are talking about. These can often be used quickly in a stream so the listener feels bombarded and will accept the facts straight away. There is a reporter called Mark Mardell who uses a lot of opinion in his speech. "You see, I think" He often starts off with that phrase, which shows he is going to give his opinion. Mark Mardell also uses hand beats to stress what he is saying as if he is agreeing with himself: this is all opinion. There are a lot of visual images in newspapers, which come in the format of cartoons, pictures, and photos. Of all eight newspapers researched, it was a tabloid- the Daily Mail- contained the most photos, (not including adverts) ...read more.

Conclusion

The BBC1 10:00pm shows a lot more detail and also contain 'gorier' pictures of events happening because the viewing audience is a lot older. There is also a newsround for kids that contain a lot of show business and has suitable stories for the age range. Apart from Newspapers and television, news is also reported on radio and by the website. Every national newspaper has a website; this gives the opportunity for up to date news. Radio gives a chance for travel reports and gives a summary of reports with any further development to them. In conclusion Television and Newspapers both present the news in different ways. Broadsheet's are formal with facts and an input by the readers, whereas Tabloid seem to contain more show business, although both newspapers have the same main stories-although they are not always prioritised- the stories are normally all there in some form. Television, the 6:00/7:00pm news often goes into not as much detail as the 10:00pm newsreels. Newspapers and television both, try to present the news to get maximal readers/viewers, even if they have to stretch the truth or leave out some facts and replace them with opinion. Information used: BBC1 News 6:00Pm 25th November 2002 Channel 4 news 6:00Pm 25th November 2002 The Sun 3rd January 2003 The Daily Mail 3rd January 2003 The Daily Telegraph 3rd January 2003 WWW.DailyTelegraph.com 18th January 2003 Rachel Sweeney 10a1 1021 (A5) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Narrative section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Narrative essays

  1. Compare how 'Newsround' and 'BBC 6 o'clock News' presents the story of the live ...

    audience as: there is a balance of young and old musicians; and there is a mix of lighter and serious issues, for example the Geldof interview and the IPN interview. In direct contrast with 'Newsround', this story is a lighter feature and fourth in the running order compared with main

  2. Media Video Evaluation

    My group decided that our target audience would be male teenagers because they would be the most interested in this kind of music video. The storyline would interest them and so would the music as it is from the Hip Hop genre which is popular to male teenagers.

  1. Investigation of TWO Information Systems.

    The idea is for the threads of articles to make sense in each newsgroup where the articles appear, for people who don't read the others. If you don't see your posting immediately, don't assume it failed and try to repost it at once.

  2. An Assessment of Bias and Objectivity in the News Media

    This view is practical and rational, for objectivity is a set of rules which is not only used to legitimise the role of journalists, but also used to protect them from denigration and legal action. The assessment of objectivity in the media thus has the ability to either 'unmask' the

  1. Compare two articles from two different type of papers, a tabloid and a broadsheet

    The size of the font is 16 and it is titled 'Drifter admits appalling triple murder' and there is a subheading titled 'Court told of 24 hours of horror after drink and drugs binge' which is about size 14 in a plain black font.

  2. Literary Linguistics and Critical Appreciation - Stylistic analysis of a fragment from novel and ...

    In our case we have the lexical item 'as' which stands as a connector between the first and the second part of the sentence. Both parts could have been a good headline for the article: Romania gains reputation and Nexus of cybercrime, but in these cases the reader could have

  1. Analysis of Mail on Sunday Article on Tourism

    homeless man surrounded by small pictures of beautiful tourist monuments.The picture of the homeless man is clever because you can not see his face because it is covered by his hair. This is effective because not being able to see his face takes all things that are humane out of

  2. ICT AQA 2006-2008 Problem 1, Theme Park

    3 This screenshot shows me selecting the image I wanted to import to the first page, there were two of the same images in two different formats, both worked when importing it into Microsoft Word so it was not necessary to pick a specific picture.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work