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Language in the Media

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Emma Lomas Language in the Media ELAH.20.014A Assignment One Advertising Advertising is a vital tool to any company, corporation or organisation; it is the most prominent method in raising product awareness or publicising a service. It would be a very rare occasion for an individual to go through their day without encountering some form of advertising whether it be commercial or non-commercial. Adverts can be seen on television, in newspapers and magazines, on billboards, sports grounds, arenas; ads are placed on various means of transport for example the tubes, trains and buses. They can be heard on the radio and now we also have the most recent channels for advertising, the internet which allows for pop-up ads, email adverts and also text adverts can be sent to mobile phones. Non-commercial adverts are used for political party broadcasts, social issues or for entertainment purposes. In this analysis I shall be focusing on commercial adverts from magazines, they are selling a product, brand or service. "Advertisements must take into account not only the inherent qualities and attributes of the products they are trying to sell, but also the way in which they can make those properties mean something to us."1 The audience will take different meanings from an advert as each person has their own aspirations. An advertiser will aim for the audience to want to buy into their product so they try to create a world that they believe you are going to aspire to. ...read more.

Middle

Without the contextual information of where the advert is placed then an analysis of this advert would be completely different. The second advert also appears in Q Magazine so it has the same audience as the Mars advert. It is similar to the Mars advert in the sense that there is very little text and also that it is dependent on cultural, contextual and product knowledge. It is an advert for Absolut Vodka which comes from a series of related adverts. The advert is on a white background with pink text and one image. The image is an iconic picture of the musician David Bowie. The text is "Absolut Bowie." "In order to make sense of the Absolut vodka advertisement shown here you need to know what to look for. Such expectations are established by reference to one's previous experience in looking at related advertisements in an extended series."5 In order to fully analyse this Absolut advert from Q magazine there is a need for not only product and previous advertising knowledge but also quite an extensive understanding of popular culture, which will help to decode this advert. The image is taken from a Bowie album cover where a pool of liquid sat in the contour of his collarbone. In this advert there is a small bottle shaped object in the same position. This use of intertextuality is a common trait of the Absolut adverts. "Once we know that we are looking for the shape of the bottle, it is easier to perceive it here."6 This image of David Bowie is accompanied by the ...read more.

Conclusion

It appears to be a completely random selection of images that have been put together including photos and paintings. The image consists of a mirrored photo of a flock of sheep, a scenic photo of a country side with an audience sat focused at a point in the middle of the page. This image is a painting of a statue with an ornate d�cor behind it along with pink roses. In the background of this image is a graphic of a factory with pipes that look like they are leading into the ornate painting. If the reader did not know that Fabric was a nightclub in London there is nothing on this advert to tell them that is what it is. The four adverts I have looked at require the audience to be actively involved but that only works if they want to buy into that ideology. The advert has to be striking for the consumer to decode it and in order for this to occur the advertisers use linguistic features such as rhyme and word play along with images. The most obvious advert is the Vodafone one as it is creating an aspiration to owning a video phone, having friends like the people in the advert and only being able to enjoy Christmas time with a new phone. The other adverts are more difficult to deconstruct as they do not have an obvious ideology so it is harder to decide why certain linguistic features were used. They are more reliant on the reader taking pleasure from the fact that they are able to use their cultural competence in order to decode the advert and therefore may buy into the idea. ...read more.

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