• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Psycho Essay

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Media Coursework: Psycho How Effectively Does Hitchcock Manipulate the Audience in 'Psycho'? The 1960's movie 'Psycho', produced by Alfred Hitchcock, was undoubtedly a groundbreaking and revolutionary film. Psycho was a landmark movie and is often referred to as the ''mother of the modern horror movie'' as it is the first horror movie that received so much success. The film itself only cost $800,000 to make, yet has earned more than $40,000,000 worldwide, mainly due to the fact that it pushed and broke the boundaries of the horror genre, creating a whole new level of fear, atmosphere and tension. Throughout the years, many directors have been making movies that seem to "scare the hell out of people". Horror films are movies with a purpose to strive to elicit fear, horror and terror responses from viewers. Alfred Hitchcock successfully makes 'Psycho' fit into the Horror Genre as it successfully does these 3 things. This is largely because of the iconography and variety of clever techniques used by Hitchcock to create and maintain suspense throughout this outstanding film. These devices include camera shots, music, graphics and dramatic irony. The movie uses the audience's imagination and forces them to think for themselves. Nowadays the film is still considered to be a 'Classic' because of all of these features. However the movie faced major controversy, as it was different. ...read more.

Middle

Although colour TV had been invented, Hitchcock cleverly used black and white instead, as a means of manipulating his audience into fear and disgust because of the associations we make with the colour black of darkness and evil. The combination of black and white portrays a dark, dull, and scary atmosphere maintaining suspense for the audience. This sets a dreary and unwelcoming mood gripping the audience further. Alfred Hitchcock uses several cinematic techniques to create a mise-en-scene. Mise-en-scene is everything a viewer can see within a certain frame and consists of many aspects. For instance, Hitchcock uses a high-angle, mid range establishing shot to put Marion in her context, and highlight her vulnerability. The music for psycho is critical to the film as a whole. Each time a character is killed, when the murderer emerges from their hiding place, the high-pitched music strings up the jumpy rhythm, before the rest of the instruments join in. The music sets the tone for almost all the scenes. The shower scene, in which Marion is fatally stabbed, would be nowhere near as effective without its music. Music is also the key to the film due to its ability to build up expectations within the audience and create large amounts of tension and suspense. The usage of different camera shots has been applied to create suspense very cleverly by Hitchcock particularly during Marion's flee. ...read more.

Conclusion

This also gives the audience the perception of being helpless, which helps to create a deep tension within them. Hitchcock uses many techniques in the scene which create an atmosphere that can change the audience's disposition in a matter of seconds. 'Psycho' dealt with issues on screen that had not been shown before and seemed totally unacceptable. Nobody had seen a toilet being flushed on TV before. This was because the toilet was considered to be a private place and for it to be shown on screen in front of an audience was thought to be rude and uncivilized. Furthermore, it was the first time ever that a woman wearing a bra on screen had been exposed. This seemed totally unthinkable at the time and offended many people. This is in view of the fact that the general population of the 1960's, was a lot more reserved. Convincing the audience of the reality of the film let Hitchcock mould their conceptions, develop sympathies, and build up identification between them and fictional characters. This hugely increased the despair, shock, and the feeling of loss even when a character is brutally murdered. Through analysing Hitchcock's techniques of creating and maintaining tension and suspense, I have come to the conclusion that they are exceptionally effective. It is no wonder that 'Psycho' became so popular and was a terrifying film in its day, and still makes viewers tense with anticipation of what's to come today. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Audience and Production Analysis section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Audience and Production Analysis essays

  1. Alfred Hitchcocks Creation Of Tension In Psycho And The Birds

    The audience become tense at this sudden change of expression and expects Bates to lose his temper and lash out but nothing happens. I am now going to look at another great film made by Hitchcock: 'The Birds'. I will compare 'The Birds' to 'Psycho'.

  2. The Birds is a suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on the 1952 ...

    However, as the birds were gathering we could hear children singing in the background, which could be seen as a substitute for the lack of non-diagetic sound. It helps to build up tension as we are only shown a small section of the playground when the birds are there before Melanie notices them.

  1. How are good and evil characters presented in The Fellowship of the Ring?

    One Hobbit that clearly stands out is Samwise Gamgee. He is one of the most loved characters in Tolkien's story. He possesses some of the usual Hobbitish characteristics, such as being chubby and having curly brown hair. Also, he shows a lot of behaviour that makes Hobbits famous, such as loyalty, braveness, humour and generosity.

  2. With reference to The Birds and Final Destination 3 analyse and discuss how the ...

    All of this links to a chain of events; Frankie dropping the camera which then undoes the seatbelts and then inevitably the death of the students. Horror films don't always have to have horror in them they also can use comedy in a sick and twisted way.

  1. Discuss how the events in New York on September 11th 2001 have been adapted ...

    These 10 minutes starts with a couple of officers going into the Port Authority station. Jon was there at the reception desk of the station staring at a crying girl who was sitting and next to her an officer comforting the girl.

  2. How Steven Spielberg was able to convery the true horror of WWII in "Saving ...

    The scene is shot as though the viewpoint of a soldier on the boat and the hand held camera making it especially realistic due to the jolting and shaking as the sea tosses the boat around. This gives it also a documentary style of shooting the scene, and adds to the realism being portrayed.

  1. How did Alfred Hitchcock change the Horror genre?

    used, but also the quantity of camera shots taken which was a record breaking 90, not to mention from 90 different camera angles! This panicked the audience in the 1960?s, placing them in positions that they did not desire, making them feel uncomfortable.

  2. "Psycho". Explore a range of devices in this film that Hitchcock employed in ...

    This scene prepares the audience for the horror that is to come later on. Marion, for instance, sits near and slightly behind the lamp. Her face is shining from the light coming off the lam, and she, like the lamp, appears to be giving out a glowing warmth.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work