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Developents in Commercial Aircraft

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Introduction

Developments in the Commercial Aircraft Industry Even though Britain's Comet 1, the first jet powered commercial aircraft to cut usual turbo-prop journey times by 60%, it wasn't the airplane that paved the way forward in jet transport. After numerous mechanical problems and explosions in mid air, the type was put to rest in the early 60s. It was Boeing's 707/720 (improved version) that really started things off. After its successful debut years, the aircraft became the backbone of many airlines' fleets (along with the first 747 [-100 series]) and played a vital role in transporting passengers to their destinations safely. It proved to be an extremely reliable and safe airplane and held with it features which are borrowed greatly in Boeing's more modern aircraft today. In the 21st century, even after the 707 was discontinued over 20 years ago, the type remains in service with developing countries' airline fleets as these poorer nations can only afford to buy their aircraft second-hand from freight operators willing to sell them at a fair price. It only took Boeing's success with the 707 to realise what a key player they could become in the civil aviation market. Not even five years later, the 727 was launched and acted as a smaller aircraft to accompany the 707 on shorter and more exotic routes (it held the ability to land on extremely short runways) ...read more.

Middle

The remaining 5% goes to manufacturers like Bombardier (Canada) and Embraer (Brazil), who specialize in smaller, different markets. Boeing Commercial Airplanes Airbus Industry Next Generation (NG) 737s (600, 700, 700ER, 800, 900, 900ER) Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 Boeing 777 (all types), Boeing 747-400 [747-8 and 787] Airbus A340 (all types), Airbus A380 [A350] Boeing 767-400, Boeing 777-200 [Boeing 787] Airbus A330 (all types) [A350] The Concorde The Concorde was a joint venture between Sud Aviation of France and BAC of Britain, and entered service with Air France and British Airways in early 1969. The aircraft was intended to be for a niche market aimed towards passengers who wanted a somewhat different experience from flights using conventional airliners, but these travellers would not expect to get this lifetime-opportunity cheap. All Concordes were equipped with standard business-class configuration, and later or upgraded models featured all of the luxuries which are standard today on this higher up type of refinement. Altogether 20 were built, and they could cut across the Atlantic in just over three hours from London to New York - a massive reduction over 'normal' jet aircraft. This made the Concorde popular for the upper-class and many businessmen used the service to fly over to North America and return to Europe the same day. ...read more.

Conclusion

Instead, a wide, comfortable, reclining leather seat will be offer and in comparison, takes up as much room as 1.8 . economy seats put together. Business class is recommended for travellers on medium-haul routes; as it fulfils the role of keeping the customer relaxed without the need of them to sleep through the journey. * Economy - trailing after business and first, economy class is aimed at the majority of travellers and is the most basic type of service offered by airlines today. Most low-cost carriers use economy as their standard service to have as many passengers fit on as possible, though this type of economy is notorious for being the harshest and most limited. Legroom, seat pitch, and the size of seats are generally a good fraction smaller than business, and only reflects the saying 'you get what you pay for'. It is rare for this type of service to offer any extra meals except for the one or two offered as standard (depending on flight), and a built-in entertainment LCD screen is also uncommon, though many airlines are retro-fitting their economy classes with a more up-to-date design. Economy class is typically a little more generous in facilities on long-haul flights, yet passengers could still suffer from cramps. It is advised that you take a walk around the cabin once every 3 hours when in economy on a lengthy flight to avoid pain in the muscles after landing. ...read more.

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