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Skeletal System Notes

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Introduction

NOTES Skeleton Diagram Remember: Scapula is at the back not the front of the skeleton! How Bones Grow When we are born most of our skeleton is made from cartilage, as grow older the cartilage develops into bone which is much firmer. We call this process Ossification. This process carries on until we are fully grown adults. An example of this is that when we are born we have around 350 bones but when we are fully grown adults we have about 206 bones. The ends of our bones are the places that contain the cartilage these are the growth plates. ...read more.

Middle

Slightly Moveable Joints They can only move a little bit and are held together by ligaments. E.g. The Ribs 3. Freely Moveable/Synovial Joints They have a high degree of movement. These are the largest group of joints found in the body. E.g. The Hips, Shoulders, Knee There are six types of synovial joints:- * Ball & Socket Joint Shoulder and Hip * Hinge Joint Knees and Elbows * Pivot Joint Neck * Gliding Joint Hand/Wrist * Saddle Joint Thumbs * Condyloid Joint Wrist Movement At Synovial Joints There are six types of movements that can occur at the joints 1. ...read more.

Conclusion

Rotation - Turning or rotating of a limb or body part e.g. the head can be rotated at the neck 6. Circumduction - The ability of a limb to move in full circles e.g. the arms can move in circles at the shoulder Ball and socket joint: Extension, flexion, abduction, adduction, rotation, circumduction Hinge joint: Extension, flexion Pivot joint: Rotation The Effects of Exercise on the Skeletal System * Weight bearing activities make the bones stronger - Less likely to break a bone * Exercise increases mineral content e.g. calcium - makes bones stronger and harder * Exercise increases the thickness of cartilage at the end of bones and increases the production of synovial fluids - this makes the joint stronger and less likely to suffer from joint injury ...read more.

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