• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A referendum is a vote made by the public on a particular issue and referendums allow voters to register their opinions on a specific question regarding policy issues, with a simple yes or no answer.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Edexcel Politics mock unit 1 corrections Question 1(a) A referendum is a vote made by the public on a particular issue and referendums allow voters to register their opinions on a specific question regarding policy issues, with a simple yes or no answer. Referendums are a form of direct democracy in the context of representative democracy, where citizens are directly involved in decision making. Referendums tend to be based on a question drawn up by the government and put to the electorate. An example of a referendum that had occurred in the recent past was the devolution of Scotland referendum in 1997. Question 1(b) A referendum is a vote made by the public on a particular issue and referendums allow voters to register their opinions on a specific question regarding policy issues, with a simple yes or no answer. The circumstances that governments have called referendums are as follows. Referendums may be used for many reasons, to allow the public to vote on issues such as constitutional change, where the public who withhold sovereignty, get a chance to vote on any issues associated with constitutional change. For instance many referendums have been regarding constitional reform such as the devolution of Scotland in 1997. ...read more.

Middle

To become an MP, the candidate must obtain more votes than any other candidate but not necessarily a majority ie - the MP does not need more than 50% of the vote. The party with the largest number of MPs goes to form the government. The supplementary vote system is a majority system with a one member constituency and this system is used to elect the London Mayor. The way in which it works is as follows. Voters have two preference votes in that they cross their first and second choices on the ballot paper. If a candidate receives more than 50% of first preferences then they are elected. If no candidate gets over 50% then the top two remain in competition and the second preference votes for these two from the eliminated candidates are re-distributed until a winner emerges. The single transferable system is a proportional system and it gives rise to multi-member constituencies. This system is adopted in Northern Ireland. The manner in which it works is that parties have as many candidate as they like and voters are allowed to rank the candidates in order of preference, seats are allocated on the basis of a "quota system". ...read more.

Conclusion

Labour received 63.6% of MPs in the House of Commons and this decreased by 0.9% to 62.7% in 2001. The Conservatives received 25% of MPs in the House of Commons and this increased by 0.2% to 25.2% in 2001. The Liberal Democrats received 6.9% of MPs in the House of Commons and this increased by 1% to 7.9% in 2001. These figures show that there is over representation of the Labour party and under representation of the other parties such as the Conservatives. Question 1(c) The factors that might explain the fall in turnout in the 2001 elections are as follows. In the 1997 elections previous to the 2001 elections tactical voting occurred to outride the Conservative Party to ensure that they would not win. The Labour and Lib Dem supporters were fed up with the Conservative party being in power. So within different regions of the country, there are higher public support for all three parties. The Labour party generally gains support in the North where as the Conservatives do so in the South. The Lib Dems have evenly distributed support. Hence in regions where Labour support was low, the Lib Dem voters alongside the Labour ones voted for Labour to out win the Conservative party. And where there was a slightly higher vo ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the devolution process in Scotland and Wales?

    Polls in both Scotland and England conclude that the public find the situation unfair. For example, the legislation imposing top-up fees for English students was passed by only a small majority in Westminster. At the time opposition education secretary Tim Yeo argued that this low majority indicated that the passing

  2. Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of various voting systems regarding voting

    Equally, there were those who felt that Labour would again become dependent on Liberal Democracy support (as in 1976-1979) in any future hung parliament, suggesting that the price of this support could be a promise to reform the system. The fear was that should the Conservative government win a fifth

  1. Arguments for and Against the use of Referendums in the UK

    enhance democracy by widening the franchise and make people feel like they were being a good citizen. However, referendums may not always be seen as positive, such as the Marxist belief that referendums are purely a sham and a cover up to government manipulation, i.e.

  2. Consider the arguments for and against retaining first-past-the-post for general elections

    An ideal system would include both of these options, but such a system is hard to envisage. First-past-the-post fulfils the maintenance of strong government and provides a link between MPs and a local area, but completely ignores the other two terms set out by Jack Straw.

  1. How and why did Federation occur?

    * This conflict became known as the Cold War and began a weapons race, including Nuclear weapons. * In 1949 Robert Menzies won the Federal election on an anti Communist ticket. He tried to ban Communism through a referendum but was opposed by the Labor party, Trade Unions and the Communist Party.

  2. In this essay I will explain the distinctive features of the Scottish political system, ...

    Opposing them are about one fifth who support greater autonomy within Britain. The Scottish Convention of the early 1990's, convened by non-party figures but supported by the Liberal Democrats and Labour, represented these people. "Scotland's Claim of Rights, which it produced, promotes the kind of political reform they wish to

  1. Scottish devolution.

    The lists have also been criticised because they are decided by the parties and voters cannot change the order. The Scottish Parliament is able to make primary legislation ('Acts of the Scottish Parliament'). Its legislative competence is limited in a number of ways.

  2. Kashmir Issue and Mediation.

    given unequivocal support to prospective UN supervision of a plebiscite in Kashmir. In recent years, Pakistan 's "internationalism" has been growing even more conspicuous .Its policymakers were showing very little hesitation, in fact, in appealing for mediation and for other form of international interventions to protect the human rights of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work