• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

American Democracy: An Ongoing Experiment

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

American Democracy: An Ongoing Experiment At the conclusion of the American Revolution in 1776, the newly born United States had a very uncertain future ahead. Under the Articles of Confederation, which had led the colonies to victory against the British, the government was not entitled to perform the actions necessary to unify a nation. This central, yet limited government was an accurate representation of feelings toward government in the nation at the time. People were wary of executive power because of the unjust rule they had been subjected to. Prominent leaders of the young nation, however, recognized the drawbacks of the Articles of Confederation and called for the drafting of a constitution. Under a veil of secrecy, a Federal Convention was called. Fifty-five delegates convened in the State House (Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on May 14, 17871. These men enumerated the powers of the government under which we live today. The Federal Government was divided into three branches: the legislative, the executive, and the judiciary. Furthermore, the legislative branch was divided into a bi-cameral legislature. The executive would take the form of a democratically elected president. Finally, the judicial branch would be known as the Supreme Court and be comprised of justices appointed by the president. ...read more.

Middle

They jeopardized the social norms instituted by the previous majority. As pluralism became more accepted in the early, twentieth century, Protestants fought not just to preserve the predominance of their religion, many also battled to enforce the moral norms associated with it.3 Though their numbers have grown exponentially in the past century, arguments made by the Christian Right based on the Bible are often dismissed as implausible for social policy. Refusing to resign themselves from a potentially corrupt society, the Christian Right attempts to use the vitality of its membership to bolster political power. This groups sees the pluralism and social liberalism in our society as a direct assault on their way of life. Since the 1970's, this religious minority has attempted to regain its status as the moral majority. It is where religion meets politics that consistency is muddled. While conservatives are quick to site the text to protect the right to bear arms, they do not see the same clarity in the stipulation that the church and state shall remain separate. Voting records suggest that most Republicans favor some form of religious teaching or practice in public schools. These schools receive public funding, however, and are thus considered part of the state. ...read more.

Conclusion

Furthermore, while in some cases the Republican party fights for original intent and to protect the rights of every citizen from the government, where religion is involved they not only vote their conscience, but attempt to force others to live in a way that is acceptable to their beliefs. Rather than commit wholeheartedly to a position that would alienate moderates, concessions are made. What has yet to be determined, however, is if the party is truly a religious group masking its Christian intentions or if they are committed to the rights and freedoms of the citizen yet aim to appeal to a religious audience. In either case, concessions are made that sacrifice ideology for political expediency. A core set of principals has long been out of sight in American politics. In an age where campaigns depend so heavily on finance, parties can little afford to offend potential supporters. Moreover, while some compromises in ideology are made, change is accomplished in smaller steps by moving the opinion of the moderates rather than by sweeping, radical effort. Unfortunately, this speaks poorly of American politics. It suggests that dogma has been defeated by the dollar and that convictions have lost out to convenience. It is apparent that two political parties, with broad, moderate views, cannot satisfy all issues with a consistent set of ideas. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Politics A: Analysing Theories of the State and Individual - Evaluation of Pluralism.

    Despite this is vital to protect against the "will of the people" and how that will can infringe upon individual rights, freedom of expression, choice and self determination. Even though democratic regimes have a mandate to govern, when it makes wrong mandates instead of right or if it interferes in

  2. Kashmir Issue and Mediation.

    Sitting down to negotiations and agreeing terms with an enemy which could have been defeated in battle was, therefore, adding insult to injury! Ayub Khan never recovered from the setback dealt to popularity by the 1965 War and Tashkent; with in a few years!

  1. Malta at the turn of the 19th Century.

    During the 1st week of March 1854 the first troops arrived in Malta and this meant that they had to be settled somewhere. The troops settled in Fort Ricasoli, the Dockyard, Fort Tigne, and Fort St. Elmo etc. The British authority in Malta encountered a small problem with the arrival of the French troops in our islands.

  2. Revision 2. Democracy and Identity Key Terms

    Stand for parliament and vote. General Election A general election is an election which happens every five years of power for a prime minister who has to take part in an election.

  1. There are many different issues of disagreement between the British government and American ...

    refused to purchase British goods, the October arrival of two British regiments to aid the civil authorities in 7. Bailyn Bernard, The Great Republic, Canada 1992, 235 8,9 Bonwick Colin, the American Revolution 1991, 74, 75 Boston reinforced Americans worst fears as to the governments real intensions.

  2. Minority Rights, Identity Politics and Gender in Bangladesh: Current Problems and Issues

    But even the urban middle-class in Bangladesh had reasons to fear: in terms of investment and business opportunities, children studying in western educational institutions, consultancies. Development Politics: NGOs at the grass roots level have emerged as a modernizing influence in the rural areas and have often come into head on

  1. Legislators have three essential functions: representation, law-making and control of the executive. How does ...

    * Use of the question hour has increased markedly over the past forty years, with more than 20,000 questions being posed during the 1987-90 term. Understandably, the opposition parties are active in exercising the parliamentary right to scrutinize government actions.

  2. Notes on Citizenship and Democracy.

    The role of mass media is to keep informed all the citizens on what is happening at present, and in doing so it?s helping the citizens to make better decision to develop their society. 1. When the printing was invented and spread all over the world, the church and

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work