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Background and Emergence of Democracy in the British North American Colonies.

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Introduction

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Middle

This document made plans for self- government in Plymouth. The compact enacted a direct democracy, in which the citizens, not elected representatives, were the lawmakers. The ideas of majority rule and ! equal justice under the law were also employed in this compact. As New England towns grew, there became a typical layout for the towns, which included a church/meeting house at the center of town. While church and state were, in theory, separate, they were, in fact, one. A system of government that was theocratic and authoritarian had evolved. These churches/meeting houses were home to many aspects of town life including the place where town meetings were held. Town meetings provided the settlers with an opportunity to discuss public problems. Civil obligations became a shared responsibility. If one was a free man who belonged to the town church and owned property, he could then take part in these hearings. The meetings had an elected colonial assembly, which over saw the meetings, and practiced direct democracy. These meetings were essential in providing colonists with a taste of self-government and self-determination. In "Federalist No. 10", James Madison described a pure democracy as "�a Society, consisting of a small number of! ...read more.

Conclusion

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