• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11

Critically evaluate the case the Yeltsin administration made for the use of force in Chechnyain 1994-1996.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Critically evaluate the case the Yeltsin administration made for the use of force in Chechnya in 1994-1996. The hostilities between the peoples of Chechnya and Russia can be seen as far back as the 18th century when Russia began to branch out to the south, effectively crushing Chechnya by 1859. As Russia began to collapse towards the end of 1991 Chechnya, under the leadership of Dzhokar Dudayev declared its independence from the federation of Russia. Yeltsin's administration did not want this and refused to accept their independence. For the following 3 years the Federation of Russia worked secretly to overthrow Dudayev but they never achieved their aim. On the 11th of December 1994 the Russian Army, under Boris Yeltsin, launched a large military operation which aimed at 'crushing with arms the secessionist regime that had been ruling the North Caucasian Autonomous Republic of Chechnya since late 1991' (Cornell article, p1). For a state to be successful in a conflict such as Chechnya it must be able to convince its people of the argument for why Chechnya should remain as part of the Federation, and it must convince them of the force required. Russia never managed to do this, the conflict was 'hugely unpopular among both political elites and the masses'(Shulman, p109). People all over the world condemned what was happening as a brutal and unnecessary act which was in violation of the Chechens human rights. ...read more.

Middle

Yeltsin spoke of this in his television address in December 1994, arguing all the troops sent and the force used were all necessary to halt any threat to the unity of Russia and to ensure her territorial integrity. Just as in 1991 Russia still did not want Chechen independence, as it may lead to more states wanting to leave. The Russian administration never mentioned any thought of a compromise to ease the Chechen problem and saw only a military method as a solution to the problem, claiming the Chechen leaders did not want a political solution. Clearly the Yeltsin administration did provide a case for why it invaded Chechnya, for instance just after the conflict Kozyrev simply stated 'if there is no disarmament in Chechnya, the Russian state will be forced to use as much force as the imposition of order demands'(Shulman, p118). Even the main goal of the conflict was still wanted, most political elites didn't want Chechen separatism and voted in favor of it remaining a part of the Federation. This was not however enough to convince Russia or the world of the necessity for the level of force used. As soon as Russia invaded swarms of media arrived to criticize every action. Because of the world could see all the details of the huge scale of Russia's military operation, even if most were convinced Russia's goal was a fair one she would fail to convince people of the means. ...read more.

Conclusion

'A close adviser to Yeltsin, on his policy towards Chechnya suggests that a treaty based solution could not be reached in 1991-94 because the conflict became a highly personalized battle of egos between Dudayev and Yeltsin' (White et al, p138). The rest of the world witness a sort of 'ethnic hatred' (Lieven, p76), where only the Chechens appeared to be suffering. The unwanted media attention and criticism highlighted this, firmly on the Chechen side, condemned the rash and forceful invasion by Russia. The case put for ward by the Yeltsin administration did have the basis and main points that any ruling state would claim to put down an illegitimate separatist revolt, it even managed to convince people that the goal of Chechnya remaining part of Russia was a desirable one. The Yeltsin administration however, used unnecessary force violating human rights and could never justify this. Because of the spotlight placed on the conflict by media the whole world saw what was happening and did not accept Yeltsins case. The war was and abject failure, Chechnya was not re-incorporated. Russia began looking like a bully and finished up looking militarily weak, the much more militarily superior country had not beaten the tiny country of Chechnya, who had held them off despite having very little of everything. Finally it caused the opposite of Russia's aim Chechnya achieved a 'de facto' independence (Shulman, p109). Clearly the Yeltsin administrations case for force on Chechnya was unsubstantiated and therefore failed. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. PUBLIC LAW

    A rule has been proposed that financial measures must be introduced in the Commons and only by the government. The Salisbury Convention of 1947 also poses limitations upon the House of Lords, one of them states that the Lords should not oppose any measures contained in the governments election manifesto.

  2. Select And Explain The Most Important Turning Points In Nelson Mandela's Life

    role of Mandela, as if he had not pursued his dreams of racial harmony the events would not have occurred hence removing the external pressure and awareness to end apartheid. Only days after bring elected president, de Klerk allowed the biggest anti-apartheid march for thirty years to be held in Cape Town.

  1. Why has Russia been prepared to execute two military campaigns in Chechnya since the ...

    These rumours were more potent on the worldwide stage and lead to the political condemnation of Russia's actions. These attacks in Moscow allowed Yeltsin to attempt another military assault in Chechnya and unlike the previous unsuccessful attempt, he now had the full backing of the people as they saw the new campaign as retaliation against terrorism.

  2. Why did Apartheid come to an end in 1994?

    However, although the general public now new of him they had no idea of the impact Nelson Mandela would later have on the oppressed races. The ANC now had some control, but they recognised that they had to use their newly gained power to their advantage, and they would not go about it lightly.

  1. COMBATING CORRUPTION IN BANGLADESH: SOME STRATEGIES

    There include rapid economic and social change, Strong kinship and ethnic ties, new institutions, overlapping and Some times conflicting views about what is public behavior, governmental monopoly over economic activities, political softness, widespread poverty and socio-economic inequalities, ignorance, Lack of Knowledge about individual entitlements, communal bonds, ambivalence towards legitimacy of

  2. Public Law

    not accountable to them, seems to defy the whole principle of democracy and 'equal rights of participation'. Although in theory parliament creates the supreme law of the land, it is argued that they only create the statutes, it is the interpretation of the judges in the courts which becomes the supreme law (by way of common law and precedent).

  1. How and why did Federation occur?

    They were seen as the first 'Yellow Peril". There were many attacks on the Chinese on the Gold Fields. They were also used as cheap labour. * Many Chinese moved from the Gold Fields to the cities in search of work. China towns became a part of most cities and became areas of gambling and drug taking.

  2. Public Law

    The formation of the European Union (EU) began in April 1951 with the signing of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), and then the European Economic Community in 1958. As time went on the Community became more and more integrated, with a growing political - and thus legal, integration.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work