• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Factors which influence the Electorates voting behaviour.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

There are many factors which influence the Electorates voting behaviour. The traditional main parties Labour, Conservative, and Liberal undoubtedly sought various shares of votes dependent on social, economic, and since the 1950's racial group. Another important influence was that of geographical area. The following provides evidence of this and the main determining post-war factors. Voting Behaviour Class Traditionally, people tend to vote according to their natural class. Since the end of World War Two, Labour and The Conservatives have been the two major political parties. It is viewed that class is seen in occupational terms, so those who have manual jobs are seen as working class and tend to vote Labour, and those in non-manual jobs, professional roles are seen as middle and upper class and tend to vote Conservative. This is not a constant but does begin to explain the social class influences on voting behaviour. In the mid 1960s, middle class voters were supporting Conservative and working class voters were supporting Labour. However, in the 1970s there was decline in the number of people voting according to their social class. ...read more.

Middle

Economic circumstances of areas tend to affect the regional vote. From voting history it can be seen that when an area is going through economic hardship, the vote for that area would normally be largely for Labour. Although geographic regions do influence voting habits, there are still differences in this behaviour even when the class variable remains constant. Age Age is a contributing factor to the way in which people vote. It is usual that older people tend to vote Conservative, whereas younger people more often vote Labour. This is especially true of first time voters who normally give a large percentage of their vote to Labour. The writer G.B. Shaw once wrote that 'If you are not a socialist by the time you are 25, you have no heart. If you are not a Conservative by the time you are 35, you have no head'. Albeit in the 2005 General Election there was a large decline in young peoples' votes, this election proved that no party should take the vote of younger voters for granted, as there was an increase in young peoples' votes to the Liberal Democrats, this is said to be due to issues surrounding the Iraq War. ...read more.

Conclusion

Race Most black and Asian people tend to vote Labour. Figures from a study by Fitzgerald in 1988 show that, in the 1987 General Election, this was likely to be due to these voters viewing themselves as being 'working class', and Labour was viewed as the 'working class' party. This study also showed that, in the 1987 General Election the Conservative Party received more votes from East African Asians than from those from the Indian Sub-Continent. A report by Saggar in 1997 suggests that, Labour have a more liberal policy on issues of race and immigration than The Conservative Party, therefore this would contribute to The Labour Party receiving a higher percentage of votes from black and Asian people. In conclusion the entire social make-up of Great Britain and a greater public/electoral awareness of the main and minor political parties has changed and diversified. This coupled with a greater appetite for parties to challenge 'safe seats' has allowed for a merging of all the above factors. It is true that Bentley identified the major influential groups of the post-war to 1990's however it is clear that information availability and the individuals desire to seek more from their 'government' has brought about major 'competition' to all political parties. ?? ?? ?? ?? Deborah Keenan September 2005 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of various voting systems regarding voting

    Minority government: Although strictly speaking British government is majoritarian with usually a workable majority in the House of Commons from a national electorate view point, many governments are elected on a minority of the popular vote. Since 1945 no government has in fact won more than 50 per cent of

  2. In this essay I will explain the distinctive features of the Scottish political system, ...

    landslide victory for Tony Blair and following this the Scotland Bill (Bill No: 104 of 1997/1998) was created which in turn would create a Scottish Parliament and Scottish Executive, devolution was granted to Scotland. On 1st July 1999 the Scottish Parliament assumed its full powers and duties.

  1. Influences on Voting Behaviour

    o Policies - in the 1997 general election labour voters were asked by ICM what the most important factors in their decisions to vote were. o Party Leaders: John Major was regarded as an asset to the Conservative Party during the 1992 general election.

  2. Comparative Analysis: The churches and their affect on society and politics in the cases ...

    own failure to respond earlier.'45 Having won the democratic elections in Namibia, SWAPO attempted to bury the detainee issue, but the victims, supported by Pastor Groth, wanted apologies, explanation and reparation. The CCN did little to support Groth, until there was such a wave of public interest that it agreed to hold a conference on the issue in May 1996.

  1. Was the Liberal revival of the 1960's and 1970's anything more than just a ...

    The general election of 1974, for example, saw the Liberal poll a very impressive 6 million votes, yet the party only gained 14 seats. In this light it is hardly surprising that the party's revival seemed intermittent and, at first glance, likely to be the result of protest voting because

  2. "Family background and social class are most influential in determining voting behaviour in Britain." ...

    At this time, manual workers made up the working class and non manual made up the middle class. It was typical for lower, working class to vote for labour and middle to back the conservatives. Although parties are becoming more coherent on their policies now, these stereotypical roles have stuck

  1. Who would you vote for?

    At the end of a contract there would be a presumption in favour of renewal, and if the company has delivered on its promises the contract would not just be handed over to the lowest bidder. A good train operator would be rewarded for keeping its promises and acting responsibly in the long term interest of passengers'.

  2. What advice would you give to Labor Leadership in light of the recent research ...

    Between 1945 and 1970 nearly two-thirds of manual laborers voted Labor and non-manual workers voted Conservative. By 1997 only about 45% of voters followed that same class-party loyalty.2 A Wallace and Jenkins study argues that political participation now reflects a new class composed of middle-class activists.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work