• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Marya Khan IB History HL Internal Assessment September 9, 2004 How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks? A. (112)Plan of investigation i. Subject of investigation. How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks? ii. Methods to be used. 1. Research for bibliography about the influence of the Tsar during the Bolshevik Revolutions. Instruments used: History Reference books. Three main books were particularly helpful: Three "Whys" of the Russian Revolution, The Russian Revolution, and Rethinking the Russian Revolution. Writing of an annotated bibliography of the topic. 2. Selection and reading of the sources to determine which ones are the most relevant and comprehensive 3. Finding opposing arguments to give and analytical view with multiple perspectives 4. Analysis of the main arguments presented in the references. B. (650)Summary of evidence 1. The function of the Provisional Government In 1917, the Provisional Government was set up in Russia. It was a "dual Power", which was a coexistence of the Provisional Government and the Soviets1. The Provisional Government was more liberal, containing members who saw the socialists as allies2, and their main aim was to restore order. ...read more.

Middle

The limitations of this book is that it is associated with one author, but multiple authors wrote each section of the book. This is a limitation because the views of each author might not be the same as the next, causing a disparity between the emphasis of each view. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, Ed 1982.The Russian Revolution. New York, Oxford University Press. The author of this book is a professor at the University of Chicago, and the book is therefore directed more towards college students, and people looking for more in depth research in the Russian Revolution. The second edition of this book was published right after the fall of communism and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Thus the purpose of the book is to inform readers of a new perspective of the Russian Revolution with newer information released by the Russian government. The values of this book is that it was written after the Russian Revolution, thus it gives a more retrospective analysis that incorporates the newer information. This helps give the reader a deeper understanding of all the factors that affected the Revolution. The book is also valuable because it shows multiple viewpoints on each aspect of the revolution, and incorporates many primary sources into it's arguments. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Bolsheviks were able to learn quickly form the failures of the Government, and established strong, promising economic, social and political reform that enabled them to overthrow the Provisional Government. F. List of sources Footnotes 1. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, Ed 1982.The Russian Revolution. New York, Oxford University Press. P. 40 2. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 40 3. Moorehead, Alan, Ed 1958. The Russian Revolution. New York, Carroll & Graf Publishers Inc. P.159 4. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 151 5. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 158 6. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 40 7. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 43 8. Acton, Edward, 1990. Rethinking the Russian Revolution. New York, Replika Press Pvt. Ltd. P.129 9. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 129 10. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 11. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 12. Deutscher, Isaac, Ed 1967. The Unfinished Revolution Russia 1917-1967. U.S.A. Oxford University Press. P. 9 13. Pipes, Richard, Ed 1995. Three "Whys" of the Russian Revolution. Toronto, Vintage Books, P. 33 14. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 132 15. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 48 16. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 17. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 133 18. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 163 19. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 134 20. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Was the provisional government doomed to failure from the beginning

    As the provisional government was only a short-term leader for the country, they could not make long-term decisions and carry them out. The problems in Russia were dreadful and needed solving instantaneously if they were to avoid any kind of revolution.

  2. What were the causes of the 1905 Russian Revolution? How successful was this revolution?

    If there was discontent amongst the armed forces Nicholas would not be able to stop the riots and demonstrations leading to lack of control. It was therefore vital that Nicholas kept control of his army. In October 1905, a general strike spread from Moscow to other cities.

  1. To what extent was the Great War responsible for the collapse of the Provisional ...

    Reed felt the "Provisional Government alternated between ineffective reforms and stern repressive measures."4 Though the accusation of 'stern repressive measures' may be an exaggeration, he clearly understands the weaknesses of the government. Therefore, the destruction of the Provisional Government and the state of affairs created by them is far more understandable under the circumstances.

  2. It was the weakness of the provisional government that brought the October revolution about ...

    These factors, particularly the food shortages and the war, were not the fault of the Provisional Government, and therefore they were not entirely accountable for their outcomes. The Government was not, after all, expected to be permanent as they were supposed to be a stop-gap between the Tsarist regime and an elected Constituent Assembly.

  1. To what extent did Alexander II succeed in reforming Russian life and institutions?

    would be bad as it was seen later on when Russia was defeated by Japan (1904-5) and Germany (1914-17). As I said above, education was now controlled by the local Zemstva and not by the church as it used to be.

  2. “The Fall of the Provisional Government was due to its own Weakness not the ...

    The Bolsheviks continually criticised the provisional government for failing to call a constituent assembly and failure to stop peasants from taking land. Not only did this put pressure on the provisional government and it regime but also highlighted the problems faced.

  1. Child Soldiers - an evaluation

    being the subject of this influence, in fact around 15-40% of child soldiers are female, depending on the region and intensity of conflict. Contemporary armed conflicts have increased the risks for children because of proliferation of inexpensive light weapons, such as the Russian-made AK-47 or the American M-16 assault rifles, which are easy for children to carry and use.

  2. Was the collapse of the provisional government inevitable

    as they had to share their land now and could not earn as much money as before. On one hand, the peasants were made happier but the landlords who were the people who could support the government was unhappy and thus this could lead to the collapse of the government

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work