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How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks?

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Introduction

Marya Khan IB History HL Internal Assessment September 9, 2004 How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks? A. (112)Plan of investigation i. Subject of investigation. How did the failure of the Provisional Government allow for the rise of the Bolsheviks? ii. Methods to be used. 1. Research for bibliography about the influence of the Tsar during the Bolshevik Revolutions. Instruments used: History Reference books. Three main books were particularly helpful: Three "Whys" of the Russian Revolution, The Russian Revolution, and Rethinking the Russian Revolution. Writing of an annotated bibliography of the topic. 2. Selection and reading of the sources to determine which ones are the most relevant and comprehensive 3. Finding opposing arguments to give and analytical view with multiple perspectives 4. Analysis of the main arguments presented in the references. B. (650)Summary of evidence 1. The function of the Provisional Government In 1917, the Provisional Government was set up in Russia. It was a "dual Power", which was a coexistence of the Provisional Government and the Soviets1. The Provisional Government was more liberal, containing members who saw the socialists as allies2, and their main aim was to restore order. ...read more.

Middle

The limitations of this book is that it is associated with one author, but multiple authors wrote each section of the book. This is a limitation because the views of each author might not be the same as the next, causing a disparity between the emphasis of each view. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, Ed 1982.The Russian Revolution. New York, Oxford University Press. The author of this book is a professor at the University of Chicago, and the book is therefore directed more towards college students, and people looking for more in depth research in the Russian Revolution. The second edition of this book was published right after the fall of communism and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Thus the purpose of the book is to inform readers of a new perspective of the Russian Revolution with newer information released by the Russian government. The values of this book is that it was written after the Russian Revolution, thus it gives a more retrospective analysis that incorporates the newer information. This helps give the reader a deeper understanding of all the factors that affected the Revolution. The book is also valuable because it shows multiple viewpoints on each aspect of the revolution, and incorporates many primary sources into it's arguments. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Bolsheviks were able to learn quickly form the failures of the Government, and established strong, promising economic, social and political reform that enabled them to overthrow the Provisional Government. F. List of sources Footnotes 1. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, Ed 1982.The Russian Revolution. New York, Oxford University Press. P. 40 2. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 40 3. Moorehead, Alan, Ed 1958. The Russian Revolution. New York, Carroll & Graf Publishers Inc. P.159 4. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 151 5. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 158 6. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 40 7. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 43 8. Acton, Edward, 1990. Rethinking the Russian Revolution. New York, Replika Press Pvt. Ltd. P.129 9. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 129 10. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 11. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 12. Deutscher, Isaac, Ed 1967. The Unfinished Revolution Russia 1917-1967. U.S.A. Oxford University Press. P. 9 13. Pipes, Richard, Ed 1995. Three "Whys" of the Russian Revolution. Toronto, Vintage Books, P. 33 14. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 132 15. Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, P. 48 16. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 130 17. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 133 18. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. 163 19. Acton, Rethinking the Russian Revolution. P. 134 20. Moorehead, The Russian Revolution, P. ...read more.

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