• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far was the First World War responsible for the growth of the Labour Party and the decline of the Liberal party

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far was the First World War responsible for the growth of the Labour Party and the decline of the Liberal party? World War One was responsible for the rise of the Labour Party sine the Labour Party members were active in the running of the country during the first world war which gained the Labour Party members experience in running the government. Despite conflicting attitudes towards the First World War members of the Labour Party did not actively campaign against the war, which prevented a split in the party. Last but not least, the Labour Party had adopted a new constitution and a programme that had distinguished it from other parties. Whereas, Liberal Party was in decline during and after the First World War since there had been a split in the Liberal Party which divided it into two clear groups and so had severely reduced the support for the Liberal Party. During the First World War Labour Party were actively involved in running the country, which had gained them much experience and influence in the government. By 1914 with only 42 MPs Labour Party members were invited into the Asquith's and then Lloyd George's coalition in running the country. ...read more.

Middle

Lastly, the Sidney Webb programme had consisted of proposal on heavier taxation on larger incomes, nationalisation of key industries and introduction of a minimum wage and working conditions. As a result, the introduction of a new constitution and a programme had given Labour Party a distinctive image as it was separated out of all political parties especially the Liberals, which helped it to utilise its support amongst the workers especially after the introduction of the Representation of the Peoples Act in 1918 which had given women and workers the vote, which the Labour Party wasn't able to do before the First World War. As historian Malcolm Smith argues that it was the effects of the First World War was responsible for the decline of the Liberals caused by the split in the Liberal party between Lloyd George and Asquith, which had tremendously reduced the support for the Liberals. Lloyd George had been appointed Minister for war in 1916 by the death of Lord Kitchener in Asquith's coalition. In 1916 Lloyd George proposed a smaller war cabinet, which proved controversial as it denounced Asquith's involvement in the war. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the First World War had led to the growth of the Labour Party due to Labour experience in running the country during the First World War, cooperation between members of the Labour party who had conflicting views in war, and the introduction of a new constitution and a programme in 1918. Whereas, a split in the Labour Party in 1906 between Lloyd George and Asquith had not concentrated on gaining the support of the voters but rather on opposing each other. The coalition with Conservatives showed that Labour Party had gone into a decline. Overall, the most important factor for the rise of the Labour party had been the introduction of the 1918 Constitution and a programme, which had distinguished Labour Party from the Liberals and therefore through its vagueness appealed to many socialist groups who had increased their support for the Labour Party. Whereas, the cooperation between members within the party kept the party alive but did not necessarily achieve success. Whereas, the decline of the Liberals was due to one and foremost factor which was a split in the Liberal Party between Asquith and Lloyd George, which reduced cooperation for working towards one goal as both individuals had diverse beliefs that had divided the party. ?? ?? ?? ?? By Tautvydas Sutkus 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. "The Rise of the Labour Party between 1893-1914 was due more to the growth ...

    of Commons, leaving them with no representation and in desperate need of some financial support.

  2. Assess the Impact of the First World War on British Politics by 1918.

    Another gain was that when Labour pulled out of the coalition in 1917 it gave them time to re-assert their independence and in particular re-organise. They formed a new Constitution which allowed individuals to join the party without being in an affiliated group and made a commitment to socialism in clause IV, which provided a practical alternative to the Liberals.

  1. Peel 'The Great Betrayer Of his Party' - How Far Do You Agree?

    These reforms did not do very much except reduce the rate of child labour in mines and factories. These reforms were linked with Peel's economic reform with the link to free trade and wanting to gain support from the newly enfranchised but also didn't want to alienate the upper classes and factory owners by excessively reforming.

  2. How significant was The First World War in the Labour Party's rise to second-party ...

    legislated in Britain."2 It saw the electorate swell from 7 million to 21 million and Gordon Phillips believes that "a considerable majority of these new voters were drawn from the working class, and were at least within Labours reach."3 Labour increasingly emphasised their link with the working class, and their

  1. How far were Gandhi's actions after 1920 responsible for Indiagaining her independence in 1947?

    Gandhi's withdrawal from the political spotlight after 1924 had seen him make little impact on politics within India. Instead, as Nanda believes, he had made a significant impact on the people, as support for the Swaraj campaign showed. He sat for the Indian National Congress on few occasions and his influence within the Indian National Congress also began to waver.

  2. How far had the Liberal Governments of Italy gone to solve Italy's problems by ...

    had to deal with, they shows whether they did deal with it and they show how far Britain had come (what Italy was striving to). The South and the North had made marked improvements in their mortality and illiteracy rates, however, if we are using Britain as the model and

  1. The Negative Impact Of World War 1 On Italy: Weaknesses Of The Liberal State, ...

    Consequently, the Socialists were now a powerful force against the Liberal Constitutional System. (Although the Socialists were not organised enough to mount a revolution many were against the Liberal system in principle and they had mass support). Support for radical/revolutionary socialism increased rapidly for a number of reasons: � Many

  2. Citizenship Child Labour Campaign

    He has attended several international conferences to denounce the hardship of bonded labourers especially carpet weavers who are employed as their small hands are vital in the painstaking process. He was targeted by the carpet weaver employers as they hired a hit man to assassinate him as he was cycling in the country.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work