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How successful was the labour government in achieving their aims in 1924 and 1929-31?

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Introduction

Mandeep Singh Garewal How successful was the labour government in achieving their aims in 1924 and 1929-31? In January 1924 Ramsey MacDonald formed labours initial administration in coalition with the liberals his appointment of red clydesider and fellow Scot John Wheatley as health minister raised hopes of social change in Scotland. The labour and liberal governments were able to out vote the conservatives over political issues. Wheatley's 1924 Housing Act attempted to initiate an agenda of slum clearance and subsidised housing but it died with the Conservative triumph in the General Election in October. In 1929 there was a minority government so passing laws were complicated, however, the liberals supported the labour party. The labour government had many aims for Britain in different areas of politics. The financial issues affecting the British population and the government were that the government required to decrease the total of expenditure; this enabled them to steady the economy and help to finance the country. ...read more.

Middle

The largest predicament for the party was there theoretical link with the communist party. This caused a downfall for the party, as there would be great opponent from the classes in society. Middle class and businessmen were opposed to communist ideas, as it would affect their investments and savings. This caused a loss of seats in parliament and the labour government was losing support due to the allegations of the party being linked to the communist party. Ramsey MacDonald toughened this allegation as he refused to carry on a prosecution against a left wing Newspaper editor, J.R Campbell. This showed the community that MacDonald was not opposed to the thought of communism and caused anxiety with the persons with cash to loose. The Zinoviev matter was an additional reinforcement to show that the party was supporting communism, as this was a note urging the British communist party to commence a revolution. This gave the conservatives an opportunity to get power and cause a demise for the labour party. ...read more.

Conclusion

The failure of both governments were that they were not capable to manage with the severe economic problem in Britain after the wall street crash and trade with other countries was declining, the government were beginning to find it hard to maintain an economic equilibrium in Britain at this cruel time. This was the major reason for the split in 1931. It was also not easy for the labour party when they were branded as a communist party as they lost support, and gave way for the conservative party to take over. MacDonald was alleged as an unreliable, erratic prime minister and was a contribution to the lack of achievements, however MacDonald is not exclusively to blame as there was other state of affairs out of his control which also contributed to the downfall and discontinued MacDonald as prime minister. I consider the labour government as successful in achieving some aspects of their aims but did not accomplish the criteria of their principles, and their outlook towards governing Britain was unreliable and showed MacDonald as an unskilled prime minister. ...read more.

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