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However before the 1950's the opposition for apartheid wasn't effective what so ever. This could be due to the minor groups whom were willing to stand up and protest. Or the violence used by the South African government

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Introduction

Coursework 3 The black South Africans were still through the racism torture for nearly 20 years now, and their efforts weren't looking to get much better. In fact the apartheid laws were getting harder. However before the 1950's the opposition for apartheid wasn't effective what so ever. This could be due to the minor groups whom were willing to stand up and protest. Or the violence used by the South African government which caused many protesters to give in to apartheid. Nevertheless this was all about to change as the pressure on apartheid was about to get very powerful. This was mainly down to groups such as ANC and the PAC. Who demonstrated protests such as the freedom day and the freedom charter. Which was all conducted in a peacefully way consisting no violence at all. These acts of peaceful protesting, inspired leaders such as Mandela and Lutuli. This increased the membership of the ANC. Other the years the apartheid laws created havoc among the blank community. The Immorality act is one. This stopped single people from having sex with other races of people. However many people didn't abide by it and so those caught would be arrested and jailed. This would lead to more punishment because in jail the blacks would usually be beaten and tortured by white police officers. ...read more.

Middle

In the 1959, there was a new opposition called the PAC (Pac African Congress), it was set up by Sobutew. The PAC got support from young people because they tried to upstage the ANC. They organised an anti-pass campaign. Later on the 21st march, there was another event was the most shocking and had a hug impact on South Africa and the rest of the world. In 1950, 5000 people from the ANC and PAN arrived at Sharpeville police station. The crowd became hostile and those at the front trampled the barriers, the policemen panicked and began to shoot into the crowd. 69 innocent people were killed, and 180 were wounded. The protesters had given up and ran away, yet this didn't stop the policemen from firing at them. After all the shooting had stopped, the remaindering surviving protesters we arrested. Due to the events from the Sharpeville massacre, in total 18000 men and women were arrested. Also huge crowds of people both black and white attended the funeral of those killed. Some say it was due to the fact that the ANC and PAC were trying to upstage each other and this resulted in a bustle. However no matter how the disaster started all international eyes were now on South Africa's government and due to this business and trade suffered. ...read more.

Conclusion

Once hearing the news of Mandela's sentence he flew back to South Africa and became the president of anti-apartheid movement. This news of apartheid was all over the world now and all the events such as the Sharpeville massacre, the freedom charter, the pass books, the treatment on the blacks and all the laws and acts that were brought in. This wasn't known by anyone internationally in such detail. So when the truth came out, it forced the government of South African into a tight position. The whole was against apartheid and there was only going to be one outcome. So in February 1990 President FW de Klerk announced Nelson Mandela's release and began the slow dismantling of the Apartheid system. In 1992 a whites-only referendum approved the reform process. In 1994 the first democratic elections were held in South Africa, with people of all races being able to vote. A Government of National Unity was formed, with Nelson Mandela as president and FW de Klerk and Thabo Mbeki as deputy presidents. In February 1990 President FW de Klerk announced Nelson Mandela's release and began the slow dismantling of the Apartheid system. In 1992 a whites-only referendum approved the reform process. In 1994 the first democratic elections were held in South Africa, with people of all races being able to vote. A Government of National Unity was formed, with Nelson Mandela as president and FW de Klerk and Thabo Mbeki as deputy presidents. ...read more.

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