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Political Parties in Kazakhstan.

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Introduction

Abdullina Elnura 996004 Group B Political Parties in Kazakhstan Political parties are a fundamental part of political system in every developed country, serving as a link between the State and the society, and indicating the level of country's democratic development. During the period of 70 years the single Communist party dominated Kazakhstan, and it was not until the collapse of the Soviet Union that the multi-party system emerged in the country. At the present time there are approximately 15 officially registered parties taking participation in the political life of Kazakhstan. They include "Otan", The Republican National Party of Kazakhstan, The People's Congress of Kazakhstan, the Republican Labor party, The Communist Party, The Socialist Party, Civil Party, the Renaissance Party of Kazakhstan, "Azamat", Agrarian Party and several others. Notwithstanding considerable progress observed in the political life of Kazakhstan during the last years and the emergence of such a great variety of different parties on the political arena of the country, the party system is still very weak due to such factors as lack of financial support, political immaturity of parties, corruption and imperfect legislation. ...read more.

Middle

Moreover, some parties tend to abuse their authority, engage in unfair competition and falsify the information. "Otan", which is known to be a "pro-Presidential party", uses its authority in order to force some people to join its rows. So, the official statistics showing that the number of its members is close to 200 thousand people appears to be far from the reality.1 These facts undoubtedly exploit people's belief in the fair political system and consequently weaken it. The second reason conducing to the weakness of political parties is the lack of financial support. The most burning issue of almost all parties, with the exception of Otan and RNPK, is the financial provision. For example, the Socialist and Social-democratic Parties have practically suspended all their activities since 1995 due to non-availability of funding sources.2 It is known that political competition and success of the particular party depends heavily on public relations, advertising, and polling, which in turn require good fundraising. Therefore, political parties, which are headed by the elite or act in the interest of some influential person or group of persons have more chances to survive and receive places in the Parliament, than those which are willing to protect the interests of common people, such as pensioners, working class, unemployed etc. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally, political parties are not a real force in Kazakhstan because of the legislative restrictions imposed on them by the government. Some people even believe that the government intentionally makes obstacles on the way of political parties in order to preserve the monopoly for the power. The "Law on Political Parties" has numerous drawbacks and to some extent even limits the rights and freedoms of political parties.3 The legislation establishes registration procedures that are very complicated and strict, so that a lot of parties cannot pass these barriers and remain illegal. Because the government has the opportunity to fully control the emergence and activity of the parties, it only tolerates the existence of those, not creating a serious challenge to its authority. That is why the majority of political parties in Kazakhstan are dependent on the State and there is no strong opposition in the country. To summarize, presently the political parties do not have a real force in Kazakhstan. Although a considerable progress has been made since the early nineties, they still remain weak organizations because of imperfect legislation, corruption, extreme dependence on the State, financial difficulties and immaturity of parties themselves. ...read more.

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