• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Resisitance To Aparthied.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

RESISITANCE TO APARTHIED THE ANC 1912-1949 1912-1930: the ANC was out of touch with the needs of the people The ANC was essentially out of touch with the mood and needs of the general African population and therefore did little to improve the lives of ordinary African people. 1930s: internal disorganisation and police harassment During the 1930s the ANC became even less active as a result of internal disorganisation as well as police harassment. 1937: time of change 1937 marked the beginning of a transitional period in African politics. At this point, the ANC recognised the need to adopt a more assertive role in African politics. 1940: Dr Xuma takes over In 1940, Dr Xuma became the new leader of the ANC. He restructured the organisation and tried to make it more efficient. But he did not try to broaden the membership of the ANC by drawing in the ordinary people. It remained an organisation that represented the interests of the elite. 1943: The formation of the Women's League 1944: The formation of the Youth League It was only with the formation of the ANC Youth League in 1944 that a more aggresive and mass-based approach was used. ...read more.

Middle

As Africanists, they were opposed to any collaboration with any organisations that were not made up of Africans. Sharpeville On March 21, 1960 the Pan-Africanist Congress organised a protest against the pass laws. They planned to lead large crowds of people to the local police stations to hand in their passes and offer themselves up for arrest. A large crowd gathered outside the police station in Sharpeville (near Vereeniging). The police fired on the crowd, killing 69 people and wounding 180. The pass laws Until 1959, all black men had to carry passes. In 1959 this law was extended to black women as well. The aim of a pass book was to control the movement of black people into certain areas. If a black person wanted to move to the city or find a job, permission for this had to be stamped in the pass book. If there was no permit, the person would be arrested immediately. Millions of South Africans were arrested under the pass laws. This had the effect of criminalising millions of ordinary South Africans. ...read more.

Conclusion

* The Rivonia Trial and the imprisonment of the ANC leaders broke the power of MK and the ANC inside South Africa. * The Government introduced even harsher legislation to suppress any further violent resistance. THE RISE OF BLACK CONSCIOUSNESS * In the 1970s, under the leadership of Steve Biko, a new movement called Black Consciousness arose. * The Black Consciousness Movement focussed on pride in being black and encouraged blacks to move away from a position of dependence on whites. * Steve Biko himself was arrested by the security police in 1977 and brutally tortured to death in detention. THE SOWNTO RIOTS 1976 * On June 16, 1976, 20,000 students marched through Soweto in protest against the use of Afrikaans in schools. * The police fired on the crowd. * Hector Peterson was the first black schoolchild to die. He was 13 years-old. * The students responded violently, and unrest swept through the country. Although the riots were eventually crushed by the police, they had more important results: * They were the single biggest challenge to the government and its system of apartheid. * The government could not ignore the unrest. * In many ways, the riots were a major turning point that marked the beginning of the end of apartheid. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Select And Explain The Most Important Turning Points In Nelson Mandela's Life

    In response to the rising tide of resistance, the international community strengthened its support for the anti-Apartheid cause. A range of sanctions and boycotts was instituted, both unilaterally by countries across the world and through the United Nations (UN). These sanctions were called for in a co-ordinated strategy by the internal and external anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa.

  2. South Africa 1945-1994 The end of Apartheid.

    For sanctions to actually be made effective can take a long time for example sanctions in Rhodesia in 1960's and 1970'5 only made the white government collapse after 15 years and a civil war costing 30,000 lives. This questions us as to whether sanctions really were effective or not and

  1. Reflections on Gandhi (1949).

    As can be seen from the phrase quoted above, he believed in "arousing the world," which is only possible if the world gets a chance to hear what you are doing.

  2. Apartheid in South Africa.

    of those who believe/experienced it to be a massacre for their own reasons OR * In favour of those who believed in the police's and government's authority so believed what they said to be the truth. Obviously those who fell victim to wounds as a result of the shooting or

  1. Comparative Analysis: The churches and their affect on society and politics in the cases ...

    The testimonies of the released detainees shook the churches and caused a great deal of embarrassment for SWAPO. The Detainee Crisis, compounded with the problem that the CCN became involved in corruption scandals, e.g. the food-aid scam44 led to the CCN losing a great deal of popular support.

  2. personal exercis programme

    It concentrates on using short burst of energy. This means that it uses anaerobic respiration which in turn means that it does not make the cardiovascular system stronger. The SPOR principles are the principles of training. SPOR is made up of 'Specificity', 'Progression', 'Overload' and 'Reversibility'.

  1. COMBATING CORRUPTION IN BANGLADESH: SOME STRATEGIES

    Capacity constraints such as a lack of well-educated and highly motivated people can severely compromise the positive role civil society can play in combating corruption. A Word of Caution: Accountability and Legitimacy Issues Civil Society Organizations (CSOS are not democratically elected.

  2. Turning points in Nelson Mandela's life

    After first being acquitted in 1963, they were retried in the celebrated Rivonia trial, and in 1964 Mandela and 7 comrades were convicted of sabotage and treason and sentenced to life in prison. Nelson Mandela was released from prison in February 1990 after 27 years.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work