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Should the Monarchy Be Abolished?

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Lisa Bannister 11P/B- Mrs Rothwell Should the Monarchy Be Abolished? Palaces, presents and pearls, is that really all that the Royal Family's life involves? The Monarchy has ruled over our country for over thousands of years, without them there would have been no England. They are much loved by their kingdom's people but are they really needed in the twenty first century? I am now going to examine the reasons for not abolishing the Royal Family. 'No two days are ever the same for The Queen,' so what is it that she does with all her time? The Queen has to perform many different duties everyday. Some of these are familiar public duties, such as investitures, ceremonial, receptions and visits. Away from the cameras however The Queen's hard work goes on; including reading letters from the public, audiences with political ministers and meetings with her private secretary. A full day's work most days of the year. Some members of the royal family have also started up charities and raised huge amounts of money for children's societies and other good causes. ...read more.


It would mean replacing sterling, notes, post boxes and the national anthem, and what would we do with all the Royal Palaces? On the other hand some people might argue that the royal family aren't needed anymore and a lot of other countries survive as republic. Now they are old fashioned, out of date and not in touch with reality. They receive the money from the government and do barley any work for it. They get what they want and when they want it. They use un-measurable amounts of the country's money for their places, presents and pearls and then turn up at charity events. This seems very hypocritical, as there are thousands of homeless people all over the United Kingdom and they have themselves eight palaces to live in. That's more than one different house for every day of the week! Secondly the royal family doesn't really do anything. I'm sure all the work they do could be done by someone else. They give the odd occasional speech and bit of charity work. ...read more.


They are becoming poor role models and not a good example of how to live your life at all. Prince William was caught underage drinking and Prince Harry using drugs. There have also been many divorces in the family, incest and affairs. The more distant members of the family also make them seem less important, do you really care what the Queens cousin's sisters aunt did last week? Lastly The Queen does not have any political power any more, the government and parliament do all the political jobs. The Queen must remain disinterested in all matters. In conclusion I think that in the twenty first century we don't need a royal family. The main loss with out them would be the money loss of which they bring in through tourism but we would gain the fifty million pounds out of the taxes that goes to them. The palaces could also be opened to the public, which would still bring tourism in, maybe more? The reputation of the Royal family isn't what it used to be, they have no political power any more and the country could do without them. ...read more.

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