• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Source A is of two graphs one of pay rates during 1919 to 1924 and the other graph is of the percentage of mines involved in accidents between 1919 and 1924 again

Extracts from this document...


1. Source A is of two graphs one of pay rates during 1919 to 1924 and the other graph is of the percentage of mines involved in accidents between 1919 and 1924 again. Both these graphs were produced in the 1970s. Since they were made in the 1970s, about 50 years after the incidents took place we have to doubt some of the facts given to us in this source. Source A is not totally trustworthy. We can learn from Source A that between 1919 and 1920 miners had a high rate of pay and accidents were fewer and less common, this was during the WW1 1914-1918, when there were high hopes and promises of "Homes fit for Heroes", something that would later turn out to be a lie. This high rate of pay was during the war when the Government took over control of the mines to channel all raw materials into the War effort. The low accidents were during the time of War socialism. Before the First World War Britain was the major coal producing country and had few rivals, but after the First World War ended new markets opened up in Eastern Europe and they were able to produce cheaper coal, British Coal was now threatened. ...read more.


This article would also have angered the TUC and the miners as they thought they were going to negotiate once the nine months or money ran out. Source E is a picture of a dog next to a TUC and miner's gramophone, this picture would have come from the government and would have been produced to gain support for the government. This picture symbolises the governments defiance against the miners, as the government is the British bulldog, and behind it is the gramophone which is playing "Not a penny off the day; Not a minute on the day", the miner's slogan. This picture is showing that the government is not going to give in or back down they are going to be defiant to the miners and the TUC. This picture was printed in April 1926, and again if the government was printing this propaganda in a daily newspaper, the TUC and miners would be infuriated as this was stating that negotiations were not going to happen. In April the government was just getting ready its propaganda machine. The dog is listening to the miner's with his back turned to them. ...read more.


They control the press and the BBC radio, which people think is telling the truth, but actually the government is controlling and is saying what they want it to say. For example when the Archbishop of Canterbury tried to give his opinion of the Strike and tell the public why miners were striking, he was not allowed to speak on the radio. The government find it vital to win over the minds of the general public and have a paper put out to print lies and give an extremely bad and almost evil view of the miners and TUC. It said things like the TUC tried to starve London and that the police were amazing in stopping them. The British Worker (the TUC paper) is less damming on the government; the government are going in for the kill and are the British Worker is less argumentative. The government is printing many posters, either showing them as strong a proud or the miners as angry and evil people, as in source J, the government is showing A.J. Cook one of the miner leader as a smug angry person, who wants to stop parliament. The government keeping saying that the miners want revolution and anarchy and keeping attacking and the TUC attack the government very little. I Karel KUMAR 10s History ESSAY ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. World war one propaganda

    He felt 'six inches taller'. They cheered for, the French, the Belgians and the Russians. The patriotic songs encouraged emotion, love and he felt it was suddenly necessary to die for their country. We understand how powerful the propaganda was as it changed moods in a matter of seconds.

  2. In what ways did the British government attempt to change the government of India ...

    The British were in trouble. The Simon Commission had been a failure. They need the support of the congress to have any major effect on India. As they didn't it had proven very difficult to get their views across. Also the fact that the Indian Princes ruled 40% of India didn't help either.

  1. 1. What do you learn from Source A about ...

    The British knew they had to give India independence but the question that was delaying this was how to give independence. 4. Use sources F and G, and your own knowledge, to help you explain why India was partitioned in 1947. India was partitioned in 1947 as a last alternative.

  2. Chartist aims and methods - Source related study.

    Whereas Lovett and Attwood represented the middle-class, Harney and O'Connor were against middle-class movement and believed that it was really the working class that were suffering. Source C shows that Harney thought of the government as, 'Tyrants,' here making an intemperate use of language, in order to stir up emotions.

  1. Japanese Political Timeline (1919).

    Source: "Twentieth Century History" Photocopied Handouts Notably, the Japanese industrial production, especially the metals production, had followed the militaristic trends. From various goods that increased in numbers of their manufacturers, metals and machine tools are increasingly became a popular commodities.

  2. How successful were the Labour governments of 1924 and of 1929-31?

    Firstly there was the issue of the agreement with USA and Japan; the French and Italians refused to sign this, and it followed that the Japanese repudiated it. A clear negative was that although the Labour government promoted international cooperation and reconciliation - it was not in office long enough to see these aims through.

  1. Malta at the turn of the 19th Century.

    Few were those governors that followed the policy that those illiterate people were ensured work in our islands. The majority of the British administrators stated their main concern was the militaristic efficiency of the fortress economy. Like in every other situation migration was another thing that the Maltese had to tackle all by themselves.

  2. Why did the General Strike of 1926 fail and what were the effects the ...

    On industrial tactics, and especially the use of the strike weapon, their impact was rather to provide a further restraining influence where inhibiting factors were already in evidence, than to initiate any change of conduct". Furthermore he emphasised this the reinforced trend towards industrial peace was happening anyway, as well

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work