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Study sources E, F and G use your own knowledge, to explain why the government was concerned about the morale (spirit and attitude) of the British people in the autumn of 1940?

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Introduction

Study sources E, F and G use your own knowledge, to explain why the government was concerned about the morale (spirit and attitude) of the British people in the autumn of 1940? In this question I am asked to examine why the government was concerned about the morale of the British people in the autumn of 1940 by using sources E, F and G and my own knowledge. The situation in 1940 was looking bad for Britain because France had pulled out of the war and now Britain were fighting Germany on their own. German forces had now invaded Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg and France. Hitler's next aim was to invade Britain he called this the Blitz. The Blitz main aims were to break the morale of the British people and destroying their homes, transport and the industry. the Blitz specifically was to lower the morale. It is no surprise that the government was worried. The British at this time had troops in France fighting against the Germans but were pushed back onto the beaches at Dunkirk. ...read more.

Middle

This source tells us why the government was concerned about the morale of the British people because he says in his diary 'everyone was concerned' in the 'East End of London'. This was were the industries were, which was the main reason why the Germans heavily bombed this part of London. Also Nicolson tells us the 'King and the Queen were booed' this suggests they were getting blamed as many people became homeless while the king and queen was safe in their palace. I can infer that things must be really bad in autumn 1940 in the East End because the King and Queen are the last two people they would be expected to boo. I can also infer that the government at this time might not be liked or trusted either. They also could be linked to the monarchy. Also booing the king and queen could lead to people not trusting their government and people might start evacuating the area. ...read more.

Conclusion

Source F is from Harold Nicolson who knew several members of the government this suggested he might know what's going on in the government. Nicolson tells us in his diary people were worried in the east end and were booing the queen and king. These reasons show why the government was concerned with the morale of the British people so they had to use many methods to keep the morale high. One method was propaganda were the government used radio to keep the nation informed as much as possible but only inform the nation of the positive stories of the war. Cinema also played a very important role in propaganda to keep the morale high by showing films of ordinary people working together to defeat the enemy. Although sources F and E tell us British people were worried source G however tells us people were continuing to turn up to work to supporting the war effort. This source tells us the government were concerned if people never went to the armoury jobs Britain would lose the war. Waqas Nasir 11E ...read more.

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