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The Apartheid State and the struggle against it

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Introduction

South Africa Coursework The Apartheid State and the struggle against it Q1. Select and explain the most important turning points in Nelson Mandela's life. Mandela's childhood was very important in shaping him to be the man he was. His father losing his land in 1919 would have affected Mandela's opinion of how the country works as he grew up, and when he was 16 the main speaker at his circumcision told that "Blacks were slaves in their own country". He grew up with the opinion that his country needed a better rule, because of how unfair it was to Black people. His earliest decisions to fight for Black liberation were made here. Another turning point was when Chief Jongintaba died in 1942. He then stayed in Johannesburg instead of moving back to Mqhekezweni, this showed he wanted to make an impact on the country as a whole instead of just his tribe or area; he was beginning to see that the duty was to his people as a whole, and ethic loyalties gave way to a common purpose. ...read more.

Middle

way the country was being run; this was because they didn't want to be excluded from the rest of the world's competitions and tournaments solely for their governments issues; it made the Afrikaners feel guilty for the regime ruling South Africa. This attitude would eventually help in ending the apartheid regime. Economic sanctions, however, were much more effective in the ending of minority rule. Foreign countries saw South Africa as a risky country to invest in because the sanctions against South Africa withdrew loans in businesses; businessmen found it harder to have prosperous companies worthy of foreign investment. The more influential businessmen could advise and pressure the government into changing its policies and regulations; it was in this way that the sanctions became effective in ending apartheid and minority rule. Placing the sanctions on South Africa was difficult for nations to undertake because of the negative affect it would have on black employment, also the great resources South Africa had to offer would be inaccessible - having a dramatic effect on world trade. ...read more.

Conclusion

De Klerk was on the right side of the party and so he had the ability to persuade the right wing into agreement that apartheid needed to be ended. If he had been on the left wing he would have been labelled as a liberal and his plans would not have worked. He took a great risk to his political career in 1992 by having a referendum on whether or not to end apartheid and this risk paid off because 70% voted "Yes"! F.W. de Klerk also began laying the groundwork for South Africa's first-ever multiracial elections, which were held in 1994, where Mandela's ANC party (freed by de Klerk) won. De Klerk was therefore more important in ending apartheid because of the risks that he, as President, needed to take and he even kept the CODESA talks going when even Mandela wanted to end them! De Klerk put effort throughout his career as President into paving the way for apartheid rule to become abolished; Mandela took the glory for freeing South Africa from apartheid but de Klerk did most of the work. Paul Claydon 11D 10/05/07 ...read more.

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