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The Federalist.

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Introduction

A) Plan of the investigation The framers of the constitution envisioned a one-party state in which partisan distinctions would by muted by patriotism and public virtue. When James Madison wrote The Federalist, not only did he fail to anticipate the rise of political parties or factions; he saw them as potentially harmful to the new nation. It is thus ironic that when Madison broke with the Washington administration on questions of fiscal policy, he took the first steps toward organizing the Democratic-Republican Party. The aim of this investigation is to find out why James Madison was considered to be the reason for the formation of political parties. It will cover Madison's reasons for writing The Federalist, what he said at the Constitutional Convention on May 25, 1787, and his and others work on how the Federalist Party was formed. An analysis of these sections will indicate why Madison was the reason for the formation of federalists. B) Summary of evidence The Federalist The Federalist is the collective title for 85 essays signed "Publius" and published (1787-88) in various New York newspapers to convince New York voters to support ratification of the new Constitution of the United States. ...read more.

Middle

A period of debate followed, during which the case for support of the Constitution was forcibly presented in the Federalist essays of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison. This source was not bias because it just gave the information about the Constitutional Convention, it did not state just one side of the arguments but both sides. This source was very important when the investigation went into the Constitutional Convention. Ketcham, Ralph L. James Madison: A Biography. University of Virginia Press, 1990. The main value of the source was that it only covered events that happened through the life of James Madison. It limitations could be it point of view: it didn't really give a perspective other than Madison's. The source didn't include the thoughts and ideas of others through out the investigation, like the Constitutional Convention. James Madison's life was the main topic of this source. Even though, it still presented a great deal of information pertaining to Madison being a Federalist and a Democratic-Republican. It also included how Madison was aided by Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, but it didn't present their viewpoint. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Democratic-Republican Party worked to oppose Hamilton and his executive based policies. With this party, Madison would later be going on to be the 4th president of the United States of America. F) List of sources Banning, Lance. The Sacred Fire of Liberty: James Madison and the Founding of the Federal Republic. N.p.: Cornell University P, 1998. 25-320. Hamilton, Alexander, John Jay, and James Madison. The Federalist Papers. Ed. Charles R. Kesler. N.p.: Signet Classics, 2003. 55-520. James Madison and the Federalist Papers. Ed. John J. Patrick. N.p.: Indiana University Social Studies, 1991. 30-146. Ketcham, Ralph L. James Madison: A Biography. N.p.: University of Virginia P, 1990. 230-643. Rossiter, Clinton. 1787: The Grand Convention. N.p.: W.W. Norton & Company, 1987. 10-362. The Debate on the Constitution: Federalist and Antifederalist Speeches, Articles, and Letters During the Struggle over Ratification. Ed. Bernard Bailyn. N.p.: Library of America, 1993. 437-750. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Ed. Max Farrand. Vol. 4. N.p.: Yale UP, 1986. 67-280. Abdule Ashour Gulledge/8th History of the Americas Why was James Madison considered to be the spark or reason of the formation of the 2-Party System? Word Count: 1845 1 Ashour ...read more.

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