• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Point of No Return - In 1763 Britain tended not to involve itself in the welfare of its colonies but after the expensive wars fought on American ground disputes arose over money.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sophia Marinho de Lemos The Point of No Return In 1763 Britain tended not to involve itself in the welfare of its colonies but after the expensive wars fought on American ground disputes arose over money. British troops had been left in America in case of further battle with the Red Indians or French-Canadians, beforehand the colonists had not been heavily taxed but the government viewed the fact that British troops were at hand in America as a profitable situation and therefore raised taxes with the excuse that the British troops were present for colonist defense. The government therefore enforced many trade laws to ensure a profit that was not being obtained due to the significant smuggling from French islands. Around the same period of time, i.e. 1765, the Stamp Act was also introduced, this ordered that paper used for legal documents, licenses and newspapers must carry an official stamp, another form of profit for the British government. Inevitably this enraged the colonists and resulted in many riots and protests. ...read more.

Middle

The presence of British Troops in Boston had long been a sore point among Boston radical politicians, this was an ideal opportunity to encourage hatred towards the British not only amongst the citizens of Boston, but amid other colonies as well. Blood had been shed, and the soldiers were acquitted with murder, not only were colonists becoming increasingly bitter towards the British government, but the colonies themselves appeared to be supporting one another in their dislike of the British. Anti-British propaganda followed the event and the Boston Massacre proved to be extremely influential on the events that followed, therefore I believe that the Boston Massacre was, if it is just to specify a single event, "The Point of No Return". In March 1770, taxes with lifted from everything except tea in order to aid the East India Company, taxes on tea were especially low, but this was yet another excuse for colonists to rebel. "True" Americans were said to refuse to buy anything that held tax, despite the fact that the duties were exceptionally low. ...read more.

Conclusion

A sense of patriotism continued to rise and colonists grew increasingly determined to rid of British authority. All thirteen colonies hence met in Philadelphia yet again to create an army and navy that would fight and eventually win the War of American Independence, 1775-83. By this time America was in quite a chaotic state, and relations with Britain were frail, "The Point of No Return" had long since been passed, though it is hard to specify exactly what this occasion was, the "Boston Massacre" seems the most plausible. It must be noted that it is not a single event that resulted in the fact that colonies could not turn back and return to the previous way of life, not that they necessarily desired this, but all of the events that took place under British government control. The prospect of wealth and liberty had originally attracted the colonists to America, and the concept of this being threatened by the British caused much resentment. This tension was rapidly built up over the events that took place in the mid 18th century, eventually resulting in American independence from Britain. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. 1. Why was 'a welfare state' introduced after the War (note here that the term ...

    A Gallup poll in 1943 predicted Labour ahead of the ruling Conservative party by a margin of seven to eleven per cent. The people wanted to make sure peacetime promises were kept after the mass unemployment and poverty of the inter-war years.

  2. Representation and Democracy in Britain 1830 – 1931

    Mrs Pankhurst had long been associated with the suffrage movement in Manchester and the Independent Labour Party. The Pankhurst, impatient with the failure of the suffragists at achieving results, advocated more militant tactics to draw attention to their demands. Both political parties were divided on the issue.

  1. The Creation of the Welfare State

    These were the five major problems faced by the British government and it is their duty to rectify this problem. The first giant that was being tackled was 'Want' this is tackling poverty, the second giant was 'Ignorance' this due to the lack of education.

  2. Deception Point by Dan Brown

    There is the use of colloquial language and changes in mode and attitudes that does not end happily. Plot Development: Accompanied by a team of experts, Rachael uncovers evidence of scientific trickery. The meteorite was indigenous and was inserted into the glacier by drilling beneath the frozen sea.

  1. There are many different issues of disagreement between the British government and American ...

    Political dissent became quickly organised. Groups known as the Sons of Liberty were formed throughout the colonies to control the spread of violence.

  2. A Detail on the British Empire Between the Great Wars, from 1918 to 1939.

    To make matters worse, Britain returned to the Gold Standard in 1925, making its currency extremely stable and attractive to buyers. This in turn drove up the Pound's exchange rate, augmenting the already-high price of exports: Britain's customers could no longer afford the high price of British produced goods, and

  1. The American Civil War

    I was surrounded by Clay men, Webster men, Anti-Mormons, Anti-Masons, original Harrisonians, old Whigs, and new Whigs, each jealous of each other and all struggling for the offices. (Tyler) His repeated use of veto power enraged Clay and Webster, who both seriously called for an impeachment.

  2. DanielO’Connell – 1775 – 1847

    > The petition of 1805 The petition on 1805 was the first time O'Connell came into prominence of Irish politics as one of the framers. The petition was in favour of removal of Roman Catholic disabilities, this was of course rejected.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work