• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To dismiss the Chartist movement as mere hunger politics is to underestimate the depth of its political support'. Discuss

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To dismiss the Chartist movement as mere hunger politics is to underestimate the depth of its political support'. Discuss Hunger politics evidence: * Chartism product of industrialisation. Problem was boom and slump nature of economy and temporary unemployment. This was one of issues that angered w/class about Poor Law Amendment Act 1834. In Manchester alone in 1837 there were estimated to have been 50,000 unemployed at some point and there were constant protests in Yorkshire re, this inconsistency of opportunity. * The man in charge of controlling the Midlands and North from a military sense had sympathy with the Chartists and reported to the government 'everywhere people are starving in the manufacturing districts. ...read more.

Middle

Tellingly, trade and output revived massively by 1843 and Chartism membership declined quickly. Depth of political support * The aims are said to be the six points and this is possibly good evidence of a political agenda i.e. none of the points said 'we want regular bread supplies'. Chartism is surmised well by Marjorie Bloy who wrote 'it represented the fundamental belief that economic exploitation and political subservience could be righted by parliamentary means'. Hence, how can political depth and hunger politics be untangled? Some variations on the six points existed and these again demonstrate a desire for other things than 'bread': these included the Poor Law abolition, no tax on newspapers and 8 hours maximum within the factories. * The London Working Men's Association was founded by skilled and fully employed craftsmen. ...read more.

Conclusion

Many middle class supporters left the movement after early violence (Attwood of the Birmingham BPU is a good case in point) and some Chartist leaders such as O Connor (whilst ironically being middle class himself) aggressively rebuked any offers of assistance from this social group. Their parallel support of the ACLL ensured success here. * Many had sympathy with the Chartists grievances but would have balked at suggestions that they should seize power. General Napier mentioned above was an apologist for the government but this does not mean that he gave the Chartists 'political support'. Conclusion: Chartism was a political movement born of economic circumstances. The superficiality of its support is best illustrated by the fact that when the economic situation improved, membership declined rapidly. This support would not have declined so quickly if the political views were deeply felt. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Compare and contrast the Chartist and Anti -Corn Law League movements. Explain and illustrate ...

    In Peel's view this would have been an issue of law and order, and not a political question. People were entitled to their say, but if they crossed the line of acceptable conduct, the full force of the law would deal them with.

  2. Account for the failures of the Chartist movement in the 19th century.

    We are bowed down under a load of taxes, and our workmen are starving. Capital brings no profit, labour no reward; the workhouse is full and the factory deserted. We have looked on every side to find the causes of distress, and we can discover none in nature or in Providence.

  1. What was Chartism and why did it fail

    Importantly the middle classes were always involved in the outbreak whereas the middle classes were relatively contented with the reform act of 1832. The government were always one step ahead of the Chartist. They were aware of their plans and had used to spies to regularly inform them and the

  2. What is Politics

    Is this distribution of resources fair? Some, usually Conservatives, would say that it was, that those who work hard should keep their wealth and that differences in wealth provide incentives to work hard and aspire to greater achievements. Others, usually on the left of politics, such as Socialists or Communists believe that inequalities of resources are

  1. Nationalism as applied to business

    Six participants were willing to take on some leadership role (such as network moderation, or leading specific projects). The network would be launched soon with an initial agenda for discussion. In conclusion, India is uniquely poised, as a developing country with highly skilled scientists and medical professionals, to play a crucial role in closing the genomics divide.

  2. Ben Hanson - Politics - Mr

    In December of 1999 Westminster Hall was opened up for debates. This is a parallel chamber open to all MPs and is intended to encourage constructive rather than confrontational debate. These meeting are watched over by a deputy speaker and no votes are cast during the session.

  1. What is Politics UK politics revision notes

    * 1992 - Conservative gained 14,091,891 votes giving them a 21 seat majority. * 1997 - Labour gained 13,516,632 votes giving them a 179 seat majority. * Pspehology - The study of elections and voting behaviour. * Popular Vote - percentage of Britain's voters that support a party.

  2. Minority Rights, Identity Politics and Gender in Bangladesh: Current Problems and Issues

    of the Bengali speaking people and hence excluded the political demands of a ethnic minorities. However that is another story. But well meaning as the above clauses of secularism were it could not withstand the political turmoil of the mid seventies, which saw the assassination of President Sheikh Mujibur Rahman

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work