• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To dismiss the Chartist movement as mere hunger politics is to underestimate the depth of its political support'. Discuss

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To dismiss the Chartist movement as mere hunger politics is to underestimate the depth of its political support'. Discuss Hunger politics evidence: * Chartism product of industrialisation. Problem was boom and slump nature of economy and temporary unemployment. This was one of issues that angered w/class about Poor Law Amendment Act 1834. In Manchester alone in 1837 there were estimated to have been 50,000 unemployed at some point and there were constant protests in Yorkshire re, this inconsistency of opportunity. * The man in charge of controlling the Midlands and North from a military sense had sympathy with the Chartists and reported to the government 'everywhere people are starving in the manufacturing districts. ...read more.

Middle

Tellingly, trade and output revived massively by 1843 and Chartism membership declined quickly. Depth of political support * The aims are said to be the six points and this is possibly good evidence of a political agenda i.e. none of the points said 'we want regular bread supplies'. Chartism is surmised well by Marjorie Bloy who wrote 'it represented the fundamental belief that economic exploitation and political subservience could be righted by parliamentary means'. Hence, how can political depth and hunger politics be untangled? Some variations on the six points existed and these again demonstrate a desire for other things than 'bread': these included the Poor Law abolition, no tax on newspapers and 8 hours maximum within the factories. * The London Working Men's Association was founded by skilled and fully employed craftsmen. ...read more.

Conclusion

Many middle class supporters left the movement after early violence (Attwood of the Birmingham BPU is a good case in point) and some Chartist leaders such as O Connor (whilst ironically being middle class himself) aggressively rebuked any offers of assistance from this social group. Their parallel support of the ACLL ensured success here. * Many had sympathy with the Chartists grievances but would have balked at suggestions that they should seize power. General Napier mentioned above was an apologist for the government but this does not mean that he gave the Chartists 'political support'. Conclusion: Chartism was a political movement born of economic circumstances. The superficiality of its support is best illustrated by the fact that when the economic situation improved, membership declined rapidly. This support would not have declined so quickly if the political views were deeply felt. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Minority Rights, Identity Politics and Gender in Bangladesh: Current Problems and Issues

    occupies a physical area of 5,093 sq. miles or 13,295 sq. kilometers constituting ten percent of the total land area of Bangladesh. It shares borders with India and Myanmar and is inhabited by about thirteen (according to some estimates ten)

  2. The British Suffragette movement.

    IX SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MOVEMENT Historians have vacillated in their interpretations of the suffragette movement and its significance. In particular, a number of influential male writers have argued that the more extreme forms of militancy were counter-productive, while others point out that it was the effective way in which women

  1. Compare and contrast the Chartist and Anti -Corn Law League movements. Explain and illustrate ...

    They thought an important way in repealing the Corn Laws would be by winning a majority, or some influence, in the legislature. The ACLL was also keen to make sure that any supporters were registered to vote, and that as much opposition as possible, was disqualified from voting.

  2. What is Politics UK politics revision notes

    * Bottom candidates are eliminated, preferences are then redistributed. * Surplus votes are counted last, but may be different to the ones in the other pile. * Retains the constituency link. Additional Member System (AMS)- * Used for electing Scottish Parliament * Combines proportionally with First Past The Post *

  1. WWI, The Twenty-One Demands and The May Fourth Movement

    This document set out to strictly establish China as effectively a Japanese protectorate. Yuan was placed in a difficult position, ultimately rejecting much of the document. He did agree, among other concessions, to the transfer of the German holdings in Shandong, southern Manchuria and eastern Inner Mongolia.

  2. Are conventions more than mere habits and do they serve a useful purpose?

    Wade also highlights that conventions serve a useful purpose, for which they were intended, in ways which a mere habit may not. A further characteristic that both habits and conventions share is that neither last forever. Conventions are like habits in the sense that, they come into being at an undefined point in time.

  1. Nationalism as applied to business

    On the other hand, it is also the 10th largest industrial country in the world, with the 3rd largest pool of scientific and technical professionals. The country has a well-established pharmaceutical industry and has made forays into the biotechnology sector, with support from the government as well as industry innovation.

  2. British Politics.

    The Monarch must dissolve parliament to call an election but - by convention - (s)he does so on the advice of the Prime Minister. The composition of, and powers of, elected Assemblies. For example, in the USA one chamber - the Senate - represents the 50 states, 2 per state.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work