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To understand the politics of China we must first understand the culture.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Beginning from the ideology that it purported to be a scientific, culturally neutral process that would occur naturally in the course of historical development1, communism has made China what it is in the present day. Using combinations from other non-liberal-democratic forms of government, the People's Republic of China seemed to have it all. In reality, this ever-growing Country, when governed by a non-liberal-democratic form of government both benefits and suffers. Through its culture, political thought and ideas, this form of government cannot survive very long in the world today. The government broke the country down and created barriers at the same time. With ever growing populations and vast resources, the PRC has all it needs to be a successful Country. So what went wrong? Why did it fail? Revolutionaries such as Mao, and Dang attempted to create a country that technically has one of the oldest civilizations, but in reality has a lot of learning ahead of them. China, according to a writer (Teufel, 1993, 7), being one of the earliest places inhabited by groups of human beings according to a writer, has many beliefs and traditions. To understand the politics of China we must first understand the culture. As Inheritors of the world's oldest continuous civilization, the Chinese can be honourably proud of their achievements. Early creation of a written language, development of elaborate techniques of silk-weaving and wet rice cultivation, and invention of the compass and gunpowder are but a few of the more outstanding of these accomplishments2. ...read more.

Middle

On top of these, more stable measures were taken with equality in mind. Trading cooperatives arrived and put food in cities and prices became fixed at, what seemed to be, a fair rate. With these new measures in place, the PRC would, now, not have to worry about inflationary pressures and could focus on such things as rebuilding railroads and concentrating on agriculture. Mao Zedong, knowing that a large portion of the population was involved one way or another in agriculture, put most of his efforts in the rural areas. After the civil war, a need for land distribution was essential and new distinctions of class were put in place. New classifications were made and all seemed to be in order. This new land reform, which seemed to be the solution, created new problems for the PRC. Problems such as the leadership's decision to give equal shares of land out, not knowing that with fifty million new landowners reduced the size of the average farm and the ability of the peasant to accumulate capital9. Another problem arose with animals and where to allocate where they are to be bread. The last and most important problem that came from these new classifications was food shortages throughout the country. This occurred because newly landed peasants decided to eat the grain themselves rather then shipping them to markets. To solve these, a new group was formed by the name of the mutual aid teams (MATs). Included in these teams were usually up to five households at first that were only temporary. ...read more.

Conclusion

People were neglected and institutions were overlooked. Another problem with the system is all the government failures that occurred. Failures such as The Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution created disbelief and uncertainty among the PRC's population. These uncertainties forced the people of the PRC to become ashamed to be a part of their country and eventually created chaos. If the People's Republic of China was simply governed with a little more thought and consideration to its public, maybe it would have survived longer. 1 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 3. 2 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 1. 3 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 32. 4 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 79. 5 Derek J. Waller, The Government and Politics of the People's Republic of China, (London, 1981), p. 42. 6 D.J Waller, The Government and Politics of Communist China, (London, 1970), p. 43. 7 John Edicott and W.R. Heaton, The Politics of East Asia: China, Japan, Korea, (Colorado, 1978), p. 37. 8 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 174. 9 June Teufel Dreyer, China's Political System, (New York, 1993), p. 179. 10 Derek J. Waller, The Government and Politics of Communist Asia, (London, 1970), p. 64. 11 Derek J. Waller, The Government and Politics of the People's Republic of China, (London, 1981), p. 157. 12 Derek J. Waller, The Government and Politics of the People's Republic of China, (London, 1981), p. 125. 13 Derek J. Waller, The Government and Politics of the People's Republic of China, (London, 1981), p. 127. 1 ...read more.

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