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To what extent do the sources agree that Russian government policy on agriculture consistently failed and that peasants resisted it under both Tsarist and communist rule?

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Introduction

To what extent do the sources agree that Russian government policy on agriculture consistently failed and that peasants resisted it under both Tsarist and communist rule? Hannah Roberts - Jones 13eld. There were many changes of agricultural policies under the Tsarist and communist rules of which all had different results and reactions. Stolypin's land law as stated in source 2 was produced 40 years after emancipation displaying that the policies made after emancipation were not successful as they were still being altered 40 years on. This supports the idea that government's policies on agriculture consistently failed. Source 1 supports this as it states that the peasants were still tied to the land after the emancipation highlighting the failure of the policies. Many of the sources state that the government policies before were a failure. Source 3 for example, states that collective farms were necessary as the policies before failed. ...read more.

Middle

There is some evidence that it wasn't the actual policies that failed, as source 4 states that it was the "stupid decisions" and the bad planning that clouded the success of the policies and made them fail. Source 4 was written after the fall of communism in 1991 were rapid changes were taking place. The blaming on planning could have been a way to protect the communist ideology and blame the planners. This source although gives the idea of success the context of the source gives reason to be sceptical on how far it was the planning that was the failure. This source however does give the idea that there were successes but the bad planning hid them. Source 2 supports this idea as Stolypin had a long term plan for agriculture as part a states that he wanted to strengthen the peasants with the ability to go further. ...read more.

Conclusion

In many of the sources there is blatant mention of the peasant resistance such as source 2 by stating that the peasants were very hostile to Stolypin's laws. This source however, was written by a tsarist official and does not give any more information about him such as what position he held. This could make the evidence biased as he could have been more conservative and didn't like Stolypin's radical ideas. The same source but part c shows that not all peasants resisted and that there were some that saw the benefits of policies. These sources do display however, the difference in the peasant's resistance as some peasants actively participated as source 4 states about the activists. There were some peasants such as the Bedniaks that benefited from being released from taxes and also got admission into schools. However, this also created more resistance amongst the peasants, as they were not seeing these benefits. This clearly shows that it depends on what category of peasant that you fell into to determine the level of your resistance. Word count - 769 ...read more.

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