• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent is the UK a liberal representative democracy?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Government & Politics Essay Question To what extent is the UK a liberal representative democracy? In the UK we have an elected dictator, Tony Blair. However some may argue that the UK system is a liberal representative democracy. So therefore to evaluate I am going to explore this argument. In the UK the demos directly elect the legislature. This suggests to us that there is direct accountability to the people, therefore the government is accountable to the people meaning that theoretically they listen to public intrest. There are many examples to illustrate this. For example the law passed in 1978 to make everyone wear seat belts whilst travelling in a vechile. ...read more.

Middle

For example; in Iraq. The majority of the people adopted the 1997 referenda, Devolution to Wales. This shows us that the government does listen to the demos by passing this law. However the law was passed to prevent the government become stuck in political deadlock and to also secure votes for the next election. This means that the government can set the boundaries for the yes and no vote to their suiting. So therefore if the government do not wish to pass a law they can set the yes vote at a high percentage making it harder for the public to win. This is a case of political manipulation. ...read more.

Conclusion

One being that the government is not bound by a superior but by entrenched consistusion. So therefore this suggests that the government can right there own rules and laws which goes against a liberal democracy where the demos has civil liberties. This means that if the government want to pass a law they have the power to do so single handedly or by using the whips. To an extent this could be in the publics best intrest however in reality its in the peoples best intrest who are going to win their votes. Secondly, the UK citizens do not enjoy an entrenched bill of rights. This explains to us that although we, the people have rights, we only do because it is not written down under law that we don't. So therefore these are negative rights and reflect back on weak governments. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Evaluate the case for using Referenda to decide important issues in the UK

    4 star(s)

    Perhaps the most important of referenda is that referendums are a form of direct form of democracy. This means that the population has a fair say in the run of the state and are rightly embodied. There are on the other hand some disadvantages to the holding of referenda.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Evaluate the case for using referenda to decide important issues in the UK

    3 star(s)

    However the voting figures became rather meaningless because it was boycotted by nationalists and government intentions were undermined. In 1975 a referendum was held over the issue of the UK remaining part of the EEC. There was a large majority in favour of remaining part of the EEC.

  1. "To what extent is the UK a strong liberal democracy?"

    A liberal democratic government is supposed to make decisions based on reason and the views of the people but many decisions made by the current government and ones past have not been the views of the majority and have been unpopular, with the strong example of the war in Iraq.

  2. Representation and Democracy in Britain 1830 – 1931

    He was employed as a Liberal candidate's assistant in London for three years, where he joined the Independent Labour Party in 1893. He stood unsuccessfully as a parliamentary candidate in 1895, meanwhile working as a journalist. But with the encouragement of his new wife, Margaret, he rose through the party ranks.

  1. The Uk policy making process.

    And in fact, in Northern Ireland where we will have an Executive composed of members from four different political parties it is absolutely vital not to be too strongly identified with any one of them since you will inevitably need to maintain credibility with Ministers and Members from all of the parties.

  2. What is Politics UK politics revision notes

    Pressure Groups: * Pressure Groups are informal political institutions that seek to influence the making and implementation of public policy o Green Peace o Fathers for Justice o Make Poverty History What do they do? * They cover a broad spectrum from the large business with high level contacts at national and European level to the smallest local groups.

  1. Does the UK constitution provide a framework for representative democracy?

    This compelled Tony Blair to re-examine the voting system in 1997. Moreover, the constitution allows the Prime Minister to dissolve Parliament for a general election at any time within the five-year term, giving him a strategic advantage and a greater chance of winning another term.

  2. Notes on Citizenship and Democracy.

    Even if it has challenges, democracy is the best system that promotes rights to the citizens and tolerance. Democracy allows people to choose their destiny. Chapter 6: Constitutionalism 1. The most important aspect of democracy is that people are able to govern themselves and enhance their way of life with laws that safeguard their rights.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work