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To what extent is the UK a liberal representative democracy?

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Introduction

Government & Politics Essay Question To what extent is the UK a liberal representative democracy? In the UK we have an elected dictator, Tony Blair. However some may argue that the UK system is a liberal representative democracy. So therefore to evaluate I am going to explore this argument. In the UK the demos directly elect the legislature. This suggests to us that there is direct accountability to the people, therefore the government is accountable to the people meaning that theoretically they listen to public intrest. There are many examples to illustrate this. For example the law passed in 1978 to make everyone wear seat belts whilst travelling in a vechile. ...read more.

Middle

For example; in Iraq. The majority of the people adopted the 1997 referenda, Devolution to Wales. This shows us that the government does listen to the demos by passing this law. However the law was passed to prevent the government become stuck in political deadlock and to also secure votes for the next election. This means that the government can set the boundaries for the yes and no vote to their suiting. So therefore if the government do not wish to pass a law they can set the yes vote at a high percentage making it harder for the public to win. This is a case of political manipulation. ...read more.

Conclusion

One being that the government is not bound by a superior but by entrenched consistusion. So therefore this suggests that the government can right there own rules and laws which goes against a liberal democracy where the demos has civil liberties. This means that if the government want to pass a law they have the power to do so single handedly or by using the whips. To an extent this could be in the publics best intrest however in reality its in the peoples best intrest who are going to win their votes. Secondly, the UK citizens do not enjoy an entrenched bill of rights. This explains to us that although we, the people have rights, we only do because it is not written down under law that we don't. So therefore these are negative rights and reflect back on weak governments. ...read more.

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