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"To what extent is the UK a strong liberal democracy?"

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Introduction

"To what extent is the UK a strong liberal democracy?" A liberal democracy is a representative system with some of the same characteristics as a representative democracy as it has free elections and decisions are made based on popular command. But a representative democracy can therefore be seen as elitist as a small number of people govern the majority. Whereas a liberal democracy includes the ideas of having varied focuses of political and economic power, an open government which is fair and responsible and an independent judiciary system. Also in a liberal democracy the government has limited power as constraints are placed upon the power of ruling government. ...read more.

Middle

Also within this state there is the freedom of choice where there are more than one party to vote for, unlike some other countries throughout the world. There are also pressure groups which influence the decisions the government make. These all point to the conclusion that the UK is a strong liberal democracy. A liberal democracy is supposed to have a government which represents the majority of the public's opinion, but in the UK a party could win with a minority vote, and also in the UK seats in parliament are not proportional to the votes won in an election. This is because the government in power benefits from this being the case so a proportional system is never introduced. ...read more.

Conclusion

Theoretically the UK has an "open government" which is accountable to the people, but in practice this is not necessarily the case. The concepts of "spin" and "presentation" undermine the openness of the current New Labour government. The Hutton enquiry into the incidents surrounding Dr David Kelly's death has revealed certain aspects of the government that are usually hidden from the public eye. I am not disagreeing with the fact that a government is needed otherwise chaos would take over the UK, what I believe is that the UK is a liberal democracy on a bureaucratic level but when some aspects come under closer scrutiny it shows that not all characteristics are liberally democratic. Jo Muter 6E2 ...read more.

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