• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What has been the impact of the use of proportional systems in the UK?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What has been the impact of the use of proportional systems in the UK? The current First Past the Post system used for general elections does not link the number of seats won to the share of the national vote. As shown in the 2005 general election when Labour gained only 35 per cent of the vote, but won 355 seats. A simulation of the last election under a system of proportional representation indicates that Labour would have at least 120 fewer MPs. There are three main proportional representation systems that have been developed in parts of the UK that try to ensure that party's seats are earned more proportionally. The use of the Single Transferable Vote, List and Additional Member systems has changed UK politics, effecting representation, governance, policy and parties alike. The first form of proportional representation systems is the Single Transferable Vote (STV). This is in use in the Republic of Ireland and for European Parliament elections in Northern Ireland. It has also been used since June 1998 for elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...read more.

Middle

However AMS corrected this with the allocation of top-up members. Hence Labour's final share of the seats worked out at just over 43%. AMS has also helped small parties to gain representation. Indeed, in the Scottish Parliament, the Green Party and the Scottish Socialist Party each won one top-up seat in the 1999 elections. AMS is more likely to produce coalition governments, which can encourage a more co-operative style of politics, producing stable and long lasting governments. In the elections of the Scottish Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales, Labour won the most seats in each body, but failed to secure an overall majority in either. Coalitions now exist in both countries formed by Labour with the Liberal Democrats. One advantage of using this system is that it allows electors to choose a constituency representative from one party and yet support another party to form government. After the signing of the Good Friday Agreement, and its endorsement by the people of Northern Ireland on 22 May 1998, power was devolved to the Northern Ireland Executive, on 2 December 1999. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is a system close to AV, and is likely to produce a very similar result. As such it has had a very similar impact on the voting systems in the UK. Its essential difference from AV is that it allows the voter to exercise only a second choice, and not a third, a fourth or even a fifth one, and thus avoids weak choices from occasionally illegitimately influencing the result. In conclusion it would seem that the general impact of proportional representation in the UK would be a positive one as it has created stronger constituency links and creates governments based on what the people really want. The current UK situation would not have happened if all parts of it had continued to use the First Past The Post system. Proportional representation has meant that people's opinions are now being heard and parties are being assigned seats in accordance to the number of votes that they have gained. The argument is now one of whether the rest of the UK (i.e England) should now also reform its electoral system thus making it more representative and fair. ?? ?? ?? ?? Caroline Hood 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    What have been the effects of the use of proportional electoral systems in the ...

    3 star(s)

    Furthermore, only a party, or coalition of parties that wins more than 50% of the public vote can form a government, and thus it is representative of the majority of the populations preferences. This is relevant to the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 which stipulates that a coalition must be

  2. Arguments for and Against the use of Referendums in the UK

    The 'No' campaign was seriously under funded, which would mean that they would have less money for propaganda and advertising, therefore making the argument very one-sided. To solve the problem of being accused in this way, funds should be provided for both sides of any issue subject to a referendum, and the government should remain neutral throughout the campaign.

  1. The Uk policy making process.

    Royal Assent has not been refused to any Bill since 1707. There are also several other types of Bills initiated by ordinary MPs rather than the Government, and they essentially go through the same process of parliamentary scrutiny. The main difference between Government Bills and Private Member's Bills is that

  2. The Impact of Electoral Design on the Legislature.

    450 seats were single-seat constituencies elected on a first-past-the-post basis; the other 225 were filled by proportional representation, with parties and blocs receiving seats according to the proportion of votes they won nationally. In those constituencies, voters cast two votes: one for a local candidate and another vote for one

  1. Political parties and representation

    Your representative owes you not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinions'). The advantages of this model, it is argued, are precisely that it overcomes the mentioned disadvantages of the first model.

  2. What is Politics UK politics revision notes

    * Saville describes their moderate trade Unionist and reformist their moderate trade unionist and reformist stance as Labourism, rather than socialism. Atlee's government 1945 * Defined Labour's idea of Socialism * Common ownership of the 'commanding heights of the economy' - Nationalisation of industries; gas, electricity etc.

  1. Should the UK reform its system for General Elections?

    The smaller parties such as the Liberal Democrats cannot compete. This is often overlooked. The amount of money a party has, the more campaigning and influence potential it has, therefore the more likely it is to gain seats and power.

  2. Decentralization and development of modern local government systems in Eastern Europe

    The group of countries analyzed here realized them by the first half of the 1990s. This newly created common "tradition" is the basis of their systemic comparison. Apart from legislation, change in personnel is necessary. There are different dimensions concerning this issue in the transformation of public administration in Central Europe.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work