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Why did extremists fail in the 1930's?

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Introduction

Why did extremists fail in the 1930's The most significant challenge to the british parliamentary democracy in the 1930's came form sir Oswald Mosley, who in 1932 set up the BUF (British Union of Fascists) the party peaked at 22,000 members in 1939 but then declined why? The main body of support for the BUF came from the North and the BUF headquaters was transferred to Manchester form London as the BUF attempted to make a big push to gain control of the country but the BUF along with the CPGB failed One of the main reasons for the failure of the Fascist party was the fact Mosley the leader of the BUF planned on the depression getting worse and he would appear as a saviour with his policies such as tariffs on imported goods, but as War began to come closer the depression did not start to worsen but began improving as more and more people were becoming employed and businesses and industry became stronger because of this. ...read more.

Middle

His cause was not helped by his marriage to a women from Berlin who idolised Hitler. This just added to his weakening support. Mussolini who headed Italy then cut his loans to support the fascist party and it became apparent that the fascists had a lack of funds to continue This was a blow and then coupled with the unity that the British people were now having because of the war coming near the fascist parties chances became slimmer and slimmer until gradually all hope was lost and they failed in the 1930's. The CPGB was formed in August 1920 with the aim of bringing about a workers revolution . The CPGB tried to work through the labour party but were marginalized and their attempts to affiliate were rejected on three separate occasions. By 1930 CPGB had a membership of roughly 2,555 which was only half of their original numbers. The depression was to the communists advantage and so to the advantage of the NUWM (National unemployed workers movement) ...read more.

Conclusion

However, if the extremists parties would have gained the same support they did at the end of the 1930's in the early 1930's just as the depression started to unfold then one of the parties would have had a great chance to lead the challenge against the national government and win. By the time support had been received for the parties the depression had already reached its peak and was improving. The extremists party as a knock on effect of the depression improving and Britain coming closer to war were knocked back by the unity beginning to be formed in Britain which meant the extremists parties could not succeed. All the parties relied on each other to gain advances to challenge the government. The BUF needed a communist uprising but because of lack of support it never happened. The big factor was that Britain saw that Hitler was an extremist and they began to see the evil in the extremists views such as anti-semities. Mosley was constantly being compared to Hitler which obviously did not make him popular amongst the public. LIAM HAYES. ...read more.

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