• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With reference to material you have studied discuss the major policy differences between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

With reference to material you have studied discuss the major policy differences between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) Both the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) have been credited to a great degree with providing the impetus and continual drive which has culminated in the signing of the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) and the subsequent power sharing institutions which have been established as a result. They both have been unwavering in their support of the Stormont executive and have been unrelenting in their quest to see it succeed. Yet in a bitter twist of fate, both the UUP and the SDLP in recent years have both been eclipsed by their respective rivals, for the UUP this was the DUP who in the November 2003 assembly elections increased its number of assembly seats from 20 to 30, making it the largest party in the assembly and for the SDLP this was of course Sinn Fein's election gains which saw them displace the SDLP from their electoral positions. This remarkable development has come as a huge blow to both parties. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore the UUP protested at the positive discrimination policy adopted by the PSNI whereby catholic recruits where selected before their protestant counterparts. The UUP have looked upon the North South Ministerial Council (NSMC) with a degree of suspicion and mistrust. Although publicly and in the context of the Stormont executive they recognise the importance of the council to develop and strengthen mutual links with the ROI, for the purposes of trade and tourism and so on, they have been quick to dismiss any suggestion that the (NSMC) would act as the first step in the formalising and indeed the eventual path of a United Ireland, as SF would suggest. Whereas the North South Ministerial Council was viewed as a body through which nationalists could get a true and legitimate political link with the Republic of Ireland, which would ultimately bring nationalists closer to a united Ireland, the British Irish Council (BIC) was viewed as the British counter part to the NSMC. The UUP viewed the BIC as a channel for building on the existing union in the new context of regional governments. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally as far as education is concerned the SDLP have worked for student grants to be once again reintroduced. The SDLP are very pro-Europe. Through this assement of the various policies of both the SDLP and indeed the DUP, it is immediately obvious that the party's are quite polarised where the major constitutional issues are concerned. They follow the traditional nationalist/unionist stances respectively on issues such as decommissioning and demilitarisation. However on the non-constitutional issues such as education and health it is hard to highlight any major differences between the two parties. In this respect it is therefore not entirely absurd to presume that the parties through their relative continuity on issues such as education, agriculture and so on, which have long been overlooked by the major parties, the two can be pulled closer to each other and through this can begin to address and resolve the significantly more important issues such as policing and decommissioning. It must be hoped therefore, that ultimately both the SDLP and UUP can come full circle and once again become pioneers in Northern Irelands political landscape delivering further chances and pushing the floundering process ahead and thus ensuring a more positive future for all in NI. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. The executive is the dominant policy actor in the HKSAR, other policy actors exert ...

    Those candidates who win elections for the Legislative Council do not acquire power to take decisions. They are only able to give advice, to criticize and occasionally to block proposals put forward by the administration. They only have little influence in policy making.

  2. Peel 'The Great Betrayer Of his Party' - How Far Do You Agree?

    Peel's social reform was very limited so in this he did not betray his party because in his Tamworth Manifesto Peel stated he was willing to reform but would not 'go mad reforming everything'. His social reforms were the National Relief Fund-1841, 1842 Mines Act, 1844 Factory Act, and the 1844 Railways Act.

  1. Why the Labour Party overtook the Liberal Party

    This appeared to have been successful - in 1922, Labour had 142 seats in parliament, holding 30.5 per cent of the vote.

  2. Devolution is not a "constitutional settlement" but a dynamic (and potentially destabilising) process. ...

    Why should Scotland and Wales be able to influence matters concerning health, education and other issues in England (because they are debated and voted on at Westminster) when issues in Scotland and Wales cannot be influenced by any English politician? These questions are now known as the West Lothian question.

  1. How effective were the social reforms of the Labour Government of 1945-1951 in dealing ...

    The task for the Labour government was to remove the last of the horrific slum housing, and initiate a house-building programme that could replace it, and the hundreds of thousands of homes damaged during the war. The Labour Party's approach was to help those most in need, the working class.

  2. The position of the New Labour government with Tony Blair ahead of that government.

    As it is known, Thatcher was a pro-monetarist and believed that government had to use interest rates to get rid of inflation and, also, the solution of unemployment was more free market. So, for the first three years the government continued John Major's achievement of falling levels of Inflation and

  1. Kashmir Issue and Mediation.

    Even diplomatic efforts under Chapter VI of the UN Charter by major powers interested in the conflict's resolutions are insufficient in cases where the powers are unable and/or unwilling to exert a lot of pressure on both parties to give and take.

  2. How has the role and impact of military rulers and civilian politicians differed in ...

    although he had to face a serious reaction from the Islamic orthodox parties in Pakistan. 10.3 Developments on the Economic Front Pakistan has been unfortunate in the sense that the majority of politicians it got were never serious for Pakistan.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work