• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With reference to material you have studied discuss the major policy differences between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

With reference to material you have studied discuss the major policy differences between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) Both the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) have been credited to a great degree with providing the impetus and continual drive which has culminated in the signing of the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) and the subsequent power sharing institutions which have been established as a result. They both have been unwavering in their support of the Stormont executive and have been unrelenting in their quest to see it succeed. Yet in a bitter twist of fate, both the UUP and the SDLP in recent years have both been eclipsed by their respective rivals, for the UUP this was the DUP who in the November 2003 assembly elections increased its number of assembly seats from 20 to 30, making it the largest party in the assembly and for the SDLP this was of course Sinn Fein's election gains which saw them displace the SDLP from their electoral positions. This remarkable development has come as a huge blow to both parties. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore the UUP protested at the positive discrimination policy adopted by the PSNI whereby catholic recruits where selected before their protestant counterparts. The UUP have looked upon the North South Ministerial Council (NSMC) with a degree of suspicion and mistrust. Although publicly and in the context of the Stormont executive they recognise the importance of the council to develop and strengthen mutual links with the ROI, for the purposes of trade and tourism and so on, they have been quick to dismiss any suggestion that the (NSMC) would act as the first step in the formalising and indeed the eventual path of a United Ireland, as SF would suggest. Whereas the North South Ministerial Council was viewed as a body through which nationalists could get a true and legitimate political link with the Republic of Ireland, which would ultimately bring nationalists closer to a united Ireland, the British Irish Council (BIC) was viewed as the British counter part to the NSMC. The UUP viewed the BIC as a channel for building on the existing union in the new context of regional governments. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally as far as education is concerned the SDLP have worked for student grants to be once again reintroduced. The SDLP are very pro-Europe. Through this assement of the various policies of both the SDLP and indeed the DUP, it is immediately obvious that the party's are quite polarised where the major constitutional issues are concerned. They follow the traditional nationalist/unionist stances respectively on issues such as decommissioning and demilitarisation. However on the non-constitutional issues such as education and health it is hard to highlight any major differences between the two parties. In this respect it is therefore not entirely absurd to presume that the parties through their relative continuity on issues such as education, agriculture and so on, which have long been overlooked by the major parties, the two can be pulled closer to each other and through this can begin to address and resolve the significantly more important issues such as policing and decommissioning. It must be hoped therefore, that ultimately both the SDLP and UUP can come full circle and once again become pioneers in Northern Irelands political landscape delivering further chances and pushing the floundering process ahead and thus ensuring a more positive future for all in NI. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. The executive is the dominant policy actor in the HKSAR, other policy actors exert ...

    They only have little influence in policy making. Pressure Groups "Pressure groups" are normally defined as "any groups which attempt to influence government decisions without themselves seeking to exercise the formal powers of government". The capacity of the pressure group to influence the government's policy decisions is minimal.

  2. Did the Labour Party show that it could govern Britain competently in the years ...

    It was even said that he thought "Uganda" was a term of abuse rather than an East African protectorate. Also, the fact that MacDonald felt the need to make himself Foreign Secretary as well as being Prime Minister may suggest that there were very few competent politicians in the first Labour Government.

  1. How effective were the social reforms of the Labour Government of 1945-1951 in dealing ...

    In Scotland it was Senior and Junior schools. When the legislation was first passed it only applied to England and Wales, a bill enabling the act in Scotland was only passed in 1946. The Labour Party's job in this respect was merely implementing this bill, they didn't see fit to change or alter it in anyway.

  2. Kashmir Issue and Mediation.

    The UN has more powers under Chapter VII, but such involvement requires a level of commitment on the part of major players in the UN which is rarely seen, and in the case of military middle powers such as Pakistan and India, the use of brute force is never really an option.

  1. Free essay

    Reforms of Turkey under Mustafa Ataturk, with regards to the revelutions from above

    Negative impact ataturk had Positively, the press often opposes these laws, being seen as the voice of the conscience of the nation and trying to be a check on the government. This causes numerous government imposed shutdowns of press institutions and also causes many journalists to face state sponsored intimidation, fines, and prison time.

  2. How did the reforms of the constitutional assembly change France?

    Also the tax rolls were based on the estates of the ancien regime. One good thing that can with the reforms for the lower classes was the fact that most of the taxation fell on the producers rather than the consumer which most of the poor were.

  1. Devolution is not a "constitutional settlement" but a dynamic (and potentially destabilising) process. ...

    The industrialised, English populated south was a predominately Labour strong hold and it was only particularly the north west of Wales that provided the highest level of support for Plaid Cymru. One major problem facing Plaid Cymru was that of the Welsh language.

  2. 'The Conservative Party Has Struggled To Abandon It's Thatcherite Heritage.' Discuss.

    process be taken upon cautiously and moderately, rather than Thatcher's urgent call to 'Roll back the frontiers of the state'. Economically, it seems that the accusation that the Conservative Party still display Thatcher's neo-liberal philosophies could be justified, although there are equally convincing arguments against this.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work