• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With the end of World War One came to an end of emphasising on social reform at a federal level. The Bruce-Page nationalist-country party government was seen to have increased its concerns with the economic value of Australia.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

With the end of World War One came to an end of emphasising on social reform at a federal level. The Bruce-Page nationalist-country party government was seen to have increased its concerns with the economic value of Australia. This was to be a changing economic circumstance compared to that of the Hughes regime in the years before. This changing factor was heard in an enthusiastic speech delivered by Prime Minister Bruce, that if Australia's great natural resources were brought into full development this 'would solve most of the economic problems that face the world'. This new imperial policy was known as 'Men, Money, Market'. The nationalist-Country Party erected such a proposal of economic plans to deal with immigration, markets, both primary and secondary, financial reforms and foreign affairs. The commonwealth now had a new role with dealing with immigration. Once left to the states was now a federal role. ...read more.

Middle

Evaluation of the slogan 'Men, Money, Markets' sees that alone Men and Money could not expand the industry of the Markets. The Bruce-Page government realised that there was no point in increasing farm output if there was no markets to sell to. The nationalist-country party then had to find new markets to improve marketing methods. New markets were opened up in North America and Asia, although Britain was still the bulk buying of Australian produce. Marketing boards were set up to promote goods such as dried fruits, wine, dairy and canned fruits. In 1924 The Export Guarantee Act was set up to authorise the government to guarantee to the marketing boards up to 80% of market value and assisted marketing products with a �500 000 injection into the system. In recent years before the Country Party was in power, they had heavily opposed the high tariffs, but authorised the belief of protection all round for both primary and secondary industry. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the twenties, several American and British companies set up secondary companies in Australia. Examples include General Motors and Ford, which were both a subset from America, who created cars and General Electric (also an American company), who created electric household appliances. Another evaluation of Australian economic shaping was evident in the rate and degree to which Australia was growing within the cities and outer suburbs. This wasn't surprising though, considering that the manufacturing business was primarily based in the cities. But by the late 1920's, manufacturing production had begun to slow. Although it had reached a third of Australia's total assembly it had come to an end, ceasing to expand. The Bruce-Page, Nationalist-Country Party coalition government, was seen to represent the agriculture aspect of society, and so it is seen in many of its decisions with government authority to protect the lively hood of so many primary and secondary producers. History E306 Naomi Fuller Economicevaluation1920's.doc 1/2 3/05/2007 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Politics essays

  1. Green is the Colour: "how people of different races, the heirs of colonial and ...

    Hence, readers see Yun Ming in the novel, beginning to question the government's discourse of propagating unity. Here, Fernando is suggesting that there is no use or purpose to portray the nation as united, when the many root problems among the different races and religions are not settled.

  2. What immigration policy should Britain have?

    Opening the borders would increase the population tremendously and Britain can not afford to house all these people it would not benefit the welfare of other people and this needs to be taken into mind. Allowing only skilled people into the country creates prejudice as skilled people do not need

  1. Child Soldiers - an evaluation

    However, if the controlled are not the perpetrators of the crime they are forcibly prepared to witness them. Many child soldiers are given drugs, alcohol and other stimulants/depressants to provide an invokement of emotions ranging from agitation to confusion, all of which assist in the process of destabilisation of all psychological development in the adolescent's mind.

  2. Zimbabwe is one country in which even after independence, the situation has not changed.

    (Meredith, 134) His tyranny and his absolute quest to stay in power saw no end when he cut off all food supplies to Ndebeleland, causing thousands of Ndebele citizens to die from starvation. The above mentioned act was just the start of the tyrannical rule of Mugabe over Zimbabwe.

  1. After World War II, Australia launched a massive immigration program, believing that having narrowly ...

    Some women protested by chaining themselves to the entrances of the Arbitration Court in Melbourne. They argued that the decision was unfair because it would do nothing to raise the wages of women in industries where most of all employees in particular jobs were women.

  2. Electoral Reform

    It's modern as voters vote for a party and not a candidate and a threshold of 5% ensures that extremists are still excluded from parliament. It produces a strong coalition government such as the one in Germany. Opponents would argue that AMS leaves half of MPs unaccountable to voters, and

  1. Slavery in Latin America

    When new elections were held in Sept., 1973, Per�n was elected president and his third wife, Isabel Mart�nez Per�n, vice president. Per�n died in July, 1974, and was succeeded by his widow. Her government faced economic troubles, labor unrest, political violence, and deep divisions within the Peronista party.

  2. Was Britain changed forever by the impact of World War one?

    Two years after the war there were fewer women working than before the war. This could be interpreted by some as the war did not change the role of women in the society. It is also possible to say the role of women did not change as the suffragettes were already active before the war.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work