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What is forensic science? How can it's study help in the detection and prevention of crime?

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Introduction

Assignment Task B1 What is forensic science? How can its study help in the detection and prevention of crime? Discuss in an essay of approximately 2000 words. Forensic science is one of the three applications of medical knowledge applied to solving crime, over recent years forensics has become more advanced and better technology used to assist in criminal cases. Forensics alone is not a preventative to crime but can be seen as a hindrance to criminal activity. Unless criminals become clever and become forensically aware, it would be impossible to leave some trace evidence at a crime scene. Forensics is not only just about finding the perpetrator(s) of a crime but can also be used to prove a persons innocence using DNA and forensic evidence. I'm sure those who have suffered a mis-carriage of justice fully appreciate being cleared of a crime they didn't commit thanks to the use of DNA and other forensic techniques. Forensics used in conjunction with policing can provide vital evidence along with eyewitness statements, alibis etc to provide prosecution teams with the necessary evidence to convict. Collating information obtained from other crime scenes and producing a database for cross-reference is a major break-through. This allows police and other agencies to compare similar cases and possibly find links to previous unsolved cases. ...read more.

Middle

Many still pursue research into the theory of genetics relating to human behaviour. Is it possible that our genetic make-up is responsible in some way for our behaviour? It has been found that psychopaths have an extra Y chromosome instead of having the XY chromosome they have XYY, but this is not conclusive. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) looked at the theory of psychoanalysis arguing that unconscious forces drive behaviour and criminal behaviour is the result of these unresolved conflicts. He states that the force of the ID (the instinctive part of the mind) is not sufficiently controlled by the ego (the mediator between our desires and prohibitions of the superego, the area that controls our impulses). This is why he based all his theories on crime being a psychic rather than materialistic need. Freud originally tried to explain his workings of the mind in terms of physiology and neurology thinking as a scientist would. Freud's methods of psychoanalysis were based on his theory that people have repressed, hidden feelings. The psychoanalyst's goal is to make the patient aware of these subconscious feelings. Childhood conflicts that are hidden away by the patient become revealed to both the analyst and the patient, allowing the patient to live a less anxious, healthier life. ...read more.

Conclusion

As crimes become more creative in some cases, police and forensics need to have the means to manage and cope with the never-ending original scenarios. So as some criminals become more creative and aware of new technologies with forensics, so must the forensic teams ensure they are always one step ahead when it comes to analysing evidence and finding improved techniques and use technology to enhance an ever-increasing field. It has been suggested by many that maternal deprivation is a factor in producing criminals. Being deprived of any attachments and bonding create emotionless and non-affectionate individuals. Child-rearing techniques is an important area of research and seen as a preventative towards breeding more criminals. Forensics may be seen as a preventative in today's society because it has become so vast that virtually anything can be analysed and identified by scientists. Ensuring you don't leave any form of physical evidence at a crime scene is not impossible to get away with crime, but you would either have to have extensive knowledge of forensic science or be very meticulous or take time and a lot of preparation to ensure no DNA or trace evidence is left at the crime scene. I'm sure there are those that feel it is possible to create the perfect crime and never be caught, as we know some crimes remain unsolved due to lack of evidence or witnesses not reliable enough. ...read more.

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