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What is meant in psychology by the term attachment?

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Introduction

ASSIGNMENT 1 Question 1 What is meant in psychology by the term ?attachment?? The psychological explanation for the term ?attachment? is where you form an emotional bond to another person or object both physically and mentally. And to feel secure. John Bowlby (1969) described it as a lasting psychological connectedness between human beings. He also stated that early experiences In childhood have an important influence on development & behavior on the individual?s life. Attachment behavior is essentially a survival strategy from evolution for protecting infants from predators. Question 2 According to Bowlby, what harm is caused to an individual if he or she is deprived of an attachment bond in early childhood? If the process of ?attachment? is ?interrupted?, the individual may develop mental issues such as depression, behavioural issues, find it hard to make relationships, even goes as far as psychiatric disorders, dwarfism, acute distress or possibly death if the attachment bond is interrupted. ...read more.

Middle

Schaffer and Emerson (1964) noted that not only do infants form a solid attachment to their mother (or mother figures), but that a substantial amount of infants also made a close attachment to their fathers and older siblings. Mary Ainsworth () had distinguished between infants who had successfully managed to make secure and insecure attachments. The results showed that it was how the mother (or mother figure) showed sensitivity, i.e. detecting her infants signals, managing to interpret them and how the mother (or mother figure would react and respond appropriately). Question 4 Describe and evaluate the evidence which has found that children can develop normally despite maternal separation? Chibuccs & Kail (1981), found that there were 3 factors. It was as follows:- 1) how playful he was towards the baby 2) how much contact the have with the baby 3) Reads a baby signals They noted that a mother would hold, smile, show more affection towards a child as well as routine physical care. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gibson & Walk wanted to find out whether 6 to 14 month old infants could perceive depth. Babies have a natural sense of danger so the experiment was designed to see if they can see it?s perfectly safe. Case studies were placed each time in the middle of a table, where 1 side was replaced by glass to expose the ?danger?. Their mothers would then try to tempt the infant over both sides. The results showed that if the case study (infant) had no depth perception then the glass drop wouldn?t seem scary and they would just walk all over the table. Those that didn?t have depth perception and could see the drop, they would automatically avoid it. Referencing Home learning college Child Psychology An introduction to the science of the study of children www.coursework.info UN Association against animal experiments You Tube URL Cliff experiment/Depth perception Learners Declaration: I certify that the work submitted in this assignment is my own. Full Name Sally Smith Address?.54 Main Street Riccall North Yorkshire YO19 6QA Please save the Learners Declaration to your PC, add your details, and upload with your completed assessments. ...read more.

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