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GCSE: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)

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Philosophy (898)
Religions (1,564)
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  • Peer Reviewed essays 1
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  1. Buddhist Worship - Temples and Symbols

    • Word count: 859
    • Submitted: 13/06/2012
  2. 'Abortion is murder'

    • Word count: 411
    • Submitted: 07/06/2012
  3. Suffering proves that there is no loving God

    • Word count: 678
    • Submitted: 30/05/2012
  4. Festivals vs Pilgrimage in Judaism

    • Word count: 462
    • Submitted: 30/05/2012
  5. Christian views on suicide

    • Word count: 597
    • Submitted: 18/05/2012
  6. Progressive vs. Regressive Trends in Islam

    • Word count: 1308
    • Submitted: 27/04/2012
"

Religious Studies involves more than just study the world's great religions. In studying the subject you may end up covering how spirituality underpins our culture, how belief systems inform how we treat each other, animal life and the world around us, and the role religion plays in societies around the globe. Youll pick up some valuable skills along the way too: analytical thinking and critical judgement, the ability to work with others, skills of expression and discussion, and ways in which you can negotiate and resolve argument.

You will cover the major global religions (and specialising in one or two), ethics, crime and punishment, personal relationships and the family and the response of societies to issues like poverty in different parts of the world. You'll need to be able to clearly discuss relevantpoints in your assignments and Marked by Teachers have a comprehensive range of assessed RS essays, which you can access to build the skills you need.

"

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • "Describe and evaluate Emotivism, showing knowledge of its key thinkers and critics?"

    "In conclusion, Emotivism is a theory where moral judgements are used to express our emotions. Many philosophers feel differently about why we make moral statements, and in essence a statement is not meaningful, unless it can be verified by our sense perceptions. By analysing the views and opinions of the philosophers, a sound and concise evaluation has been produced."

  • What are the main features of classical utilitarianism? Assess the strengths and weaknesses of classical utilitarianism.

    "The whole aim of utilitarianism is to produce the greatest good for the greatest number and it is true that the majority of pleasure is followed. This is a suitable conclusion in many situations but we have to consider whether this is always a good thing. W.D.Ross considered the duties he thought should be put beside happiness such as fidelity, justice, beneficence, self-improvement and nonmalificence. It is also not always beneficial to have constant majority rule as this excludes many minorities such as pressure groups like Greenpeace or previously the Suffragettes. It also excludes disabled people and could lead to eugenics as initiated by Hitler as he ethnically cleansed Germany of all Jews and other minorities. Hannah Fleming L6E 6.10.03"

  • Christians should never agree with abortion. Discuss

    "In conclusion, although the foetus may not be a full human yet it still has that potential to be one, so that needs to be taken into account. God also should only have the power to give and take away life as Christians see everyone as Gods creation so therefore he should only have the right to take away our lives since he created us. But Christian should still agree with abortion in some circumstances such as the ones required by 1990 Human and Embryology act, which are if the mental or physical health of the mother or any existing children are at risk or if their was a risk that the baby would be born seriously handicapped. The reason for this would solely be to protect the people who are already alive and fully human which is very important for lots of Christians."

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