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a detailed account of Jewish food laws and origins

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Introduction

Give a detailed account of Jewish food laws and origins These are the animals which you are permitted to eat ... anything which has a completely split hoof and chews the cud, this you may eat. (Leviticus 11:2-3) Jews are permitted to eat the flesh from some animals that are vegetarian. These animals chew the cud and have a split hoof, such as sheep. Jews are not at liberty to eat birds of prey, for example eagles: however domestic birds such as chicken, are permissible because they do not eat meat. Even though turkey does fall under this category, some Jews avoid eating it because it does not specifically say in the Torah whether it is allowed or not. A few insects are permitted however sages are not sure which particular species are allowed so eating insects is avoided. Fish is only allowed to be consumed if it has fins and scales e.g. cod. Rodents, reptiles and amphibians are prohibited. ...read more.

Middle

According to Judaism, moreover life is in the blood, and so Jews do not eat it. To get rid of the blood, Jews should rinse it off and then bathe the meat in cold water for at least half an hour. They then should pour on koshering salt and leave it on a draining board for one hour. Finally it should be bathed in cold water. This is a long process so nowadays kosher butchers tend to do this before selling the meat. The blood from the liver should be removed carefully as liver has high blood content. The liver should be cut open and salted before being roasted or grilled to remove any excess blood. When cooking, eggs should be broken into a glass separately to check if there is a blood spot. If there is a spot, then the egg should be thrown away. A glass is used because it is transparent and it does not absorb its contents. ...read more.

Conclusion

The agent that makes the milk curdle is produced from the walls of a calf's stomach and is called rennet. Technically, cheese is therefore a mixture of both milk and meat. That said, rennet is not regarded as "meat" because it is chemically altered whilst it being manufactured. However, the Talmud is particularly strict about the production of cheese so Jewish supervision is required. Unsupervised vegetarian cheese is therefore not kosher. Fruit and vegetables are washed to make sure that there are no insects in them. Lettuce is cleaned particularly carefully by washing each leaf separately or leaving it in a bowl of salt water for a period of time. Fruit should be sliced open and stoned Wine or grape juice may only be drunk if it is made and bottled under the supervision of a Jew. This is because wine is often used in many ceremonies in other religions e.g. Communion. Wine should not be touched by a non-Jew unless it has been certified as "boiled". This is a Rabbinical commandment, On Passover, Jews are forbidden to eat oats, wheat, barley, spelt and rye: the laws that apply at Passover are more stringent. ...read more.

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