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A God who intervenes miraculously in the world cannot be benevolent

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Introduction

A God who intervenes miraculously in the world cannot be benevolent . Discuss This statement is a paradox in itself, as it assumes that God can act miraculously, and that He is benevolent. This can be seen as a contradiction, as these two beliefs are incompatible. A God who intervenes miraculously in the world cannot be benevolent, because of the presence of natural and moral evil in the world. Surely a God who was able to act through miracles and prevent such evil and chose not to would be partisan, which would obviously detract from his benevolence. Therefore this statement poses a challenge to the theist, who believes in both a benevolent God who cares for humanity, and an omnipotent God who is able to perform the miraculous. ...read more.

Middle

Gareth Moore develops this point further, and suggests that it is possible that God is irrelevant to the concept of miracle, and that miracles are simply events, which cannot be explained. With this interpretation there is the implication that if miracles cannot be explained, the motivation for God creating them out of his benevolence is even harder to establish. If there were reasons and explanations for miracles, and God was seen to decide when reasons are justified for a miracle to take place, it would be hard to equate the God of the Bible who is benevolent with such harsh and partisan actions. However there is evidence in the Old Testament, that suggests that God is partisan, for example the idea that God will come to judge us on Judgement Day seems unjust and shallow. ...read more.

Conclusion

However as Kenny points out, 'God can only do that which is logically possible for God to do.' Thus if God's power or benevolence is limited then His actions will be limited accordingly. We have no way of measuring His power or goodness, because it is a relative concept. To talk of goodness as a measuring stick would imply that we know the extent of it. It could be argued that as finite beings we cannot grasp the concept of God's infinite goodness, and therefore cannot judge Him in relation to the suffering of this finite world. By questioning God's actions, and judging His acts of miraculous intervention in the world, it implies that we know the extent of God's power and goodness, and thus know how He should act. However this is not the case, and we cannot understand God's actions logically but only through faith. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ailsa Bulloch Theology Coursework ...read more.

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