• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

As humans we are always aiming for something in particular and when we do not achieve what we set out to do feelings of failure are felt or expressed in various ways as Greene illustrates in the stories "Special Duties", "The Hint of an Explanation".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Theme of Failure Failure is something we all encounter in life. As humans we are always aiming for something in particular and when we do not achieve what we set out to do feelings of failure are felt or expressed in various ways as Greene illustrates in the stories "Special Duties", "The Hint of an Explanation", "A Chance for Mr. Lever". In the story "Special Duties" we see how Greene treats failure in a humorous way. Firstly we note that Mr. Ferraro fails to understand the concept of God and heaven. He thinks that God is some sort of business man, "it was not unreasonable for Mr. Ferraro to return the compliment and to regard God as the director of some supreme business" hence he believes that he can simply buy time in heaven through Miss Saunders, his special secretary, who carries out indulgences in his name so that he may obtain more days in heaven. ...read more.

Middle

First we note that due to David's innocence he fails to see that Blacker is simply trying to use him, by allowing him to play on electric train set. He doesn't realise Blacker's true plan "to revenge himself on everything he hated- my father, the Catholics, the God whom persisted in crediting- by corrupting me." The boy also fails the church as he abuses his position as altar boy to get the host for Blacker. Yet this failure is not self- inflicted but because Blacker had corned him in doing so and because he was afraid of the consequences if he didn't do as Blacker said "I think it was fear- fear of the terrible thing called bleeding- as much as covetousness that drove me to carry out my instructions." Ultimately we see a transition of failure from David to Blacker when David decides to do the right thing by not giving him the host "I couldn't separate the Host from the paper, so I swallowed both." ...read more.

Conclusion

By forging Davidson's signature on the contract of the crusher Mr. Lever thinks he has finally succeeded. Just as he does this he is bitten by a mosquito, the mosquitos that he claimed all through out the story not to have seen "give Mr. Lever three days of happiness." In the end we see that Mr. Lever fails when he thinks he is successful. He fails to expect the unexpected and this lack of insight is what costs him his life. In the previous two stories mentioned we don't feel badly for any of the characters. However when Green describes him as being a man who really loves his wife "He took out his wife's photograph and stood it on the chop-box." and that he even feels badly when he sees a dead black man squashed to fit into a ditch "Mr. Lever would have liked very much to say a prayer." we do feel an element of pathos for Mr. Lever. He doesn't deserve to fail. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Existence of God section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Existence of God essays

  1. Identify 3 novels, short stories or poems that would have special significance to the ...

    She looked at her thumb and it was wet. 'Now look what I've done!' cried the second lady exasperated. The others stopped and peered over. The second lady held out her embroidery. There was the scene, perfect except that while the embroidered yellow sun shone down upon the embroidered green

  2. "The Sinner is often the Saint." In what way does Greene explore this paradox ...

    It is this love, which Yusef has for Scobie that also represents a paradox to mirror the one seen in the title, that one so evil, a 'sinner', can acknowledge the existence of a 'saint'. Another method, which Greene has used to highlight the 'saint' in Scobie, is by contrasting

  1. A Single Eye As An Attack on Puritanism.

    According to Clarkson, the problem with the status quo is that he "could find very few that could define unto [him] the Object of their worship."4 Placing this early in the piece serves to trap the reader by saying something that is inherently true; the intangibility of God produces the impossibility of defining or categorizing the nature of God.

  2. As a recovering addict, I can understand Lao Tse's instructions regarding desire. He ...

    In the interpretation of Philip J. Ivanhoe, it reads, "The Dao that can be told is not the eternal Dao." It is the problem of translation and limit of language that is the point of the first chapter of the Tao-te Ching.

  1. Can we know something that has not yet been proven true?

    witness accounts as absolute nonsense, but that is simply because they do not consider this as a reliable source of evidence for such an event. Therefore they conclude that this certain thing never happened, and therefore if has not been proven true.

  2. 'Can we know something that has not yet been proven true?'

    Therefore I draw to the conclusion that my belief in Australia's existence is true. And is therefore my knowledge that Australia exists. Although not all proofs are empirical, most universal knowledge tends to be proven with scientific experiments. This is because the results of scientific experiments are taken to be

  1. "By discovering something new, a character can change for the better." Is this ...

    there was no aim to her future, because it was already all figured out and she was in no power to alter that, which was the reason why she went to a pay a visit to her author, begging him for "an extra 30 pages."

  2. To what extent the Hare Krishna movement can be described as a cult

    No eating of meat, fish or eggs. 2. No gambling. 3. No sex other than for procreation within marriage. 4. No intoxication, including all recreational drugs, alcohol, tobacco, tea and coffee. According to the Bhagavad-Gita, indulgence in the above activities disrupts our physical, mental, and spiritual well-being and increases anxiety and conflict in society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work