• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Country Lovers vs. The Gold Cadillac.

Extracts from this document...


Scott Bissett 10B 7/12/02 Country Lovers vs. The Gold Cadillac Both of the two stories, Country Lovers and The Gold Cadillac reveal racism. It is not a particularly hidden message. But the two of them approach it from slightly different angles. Country Lovers shows that the story is based around racism in the first paragraph: [the black children are] "beginning to call their old playmates missus and baasie - little master". Within the Gold Cadillac, the racism is a little better concealed. We don't know that the main family are black for sure, until line 166, after Wilbert (the father) has said he is going to go down to Mississippi and Mr. Pondexter say "Not much those folks hate more'n to see a northern Negro coming down there in a fine car". ...read more.


In Country Lovers, it is obviously about racism from line 10 onwards. We are constantly finding out how the white people have a far better life than the black people: in education, belongings, housing, and general life. For example, while Thebedi and Njabulo live in a "hut Njabulo had built in white-man's style, with a tin chimney, and a proper window with glass panes set in straight as walls made of unfired bricks would allow", the farmer and his son lived in a house "thick-walled, dark against the heat." It is interesting to note that Njabulo has attempted to copy the white man's house, but doesn't have the resources available. The way we are told, it seems that having a "proper window" is something he is very proud of. ...read more.


When the family are stopped on the side of the road because their father was tired, 'Lois took a knife and was defending her family, even though she did not know from what or why, she just knew that she had to. In Country Lovers, it was a clear story, that the white man lived a better life, and then the farmer's son kills his baby and gets away with it. However in The Gold Cadillac, the story is a bit more complex, as we are looking through the eyes of a child, who cannot understand everything. As a result of this, we don't know either the mother's or the father's reasoning behind their actions unless they tell 'Lois. So in conclusion, I believe that The Gold Cadillac reveals racism far better; mostly thanks to the way it is put forward with a child narrator. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Prejudice and Discrimination section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Prejudice and Discrimination essays

  1. Discuss the ways in which Nadine Gordimer and Mildred Taylor portray racism in their ...

    In fact it is not immediately obvious that this is a black family. In the story black people can do things such as buying houses and cars: " Let's take ourselves a ride in our brand new Cadillac." As Wilbert can splash out on a golden Cadillac, this indicates that he may have a well-paid job.

  2. show racism the red card'

    Type of Act of Racist Violence The racist acts towards to an ethnic group can take several negative forms of the most passive to the most active. v. Place of racism violence To finish this overview, it is important to situate the act racism.

  1. The narrator in Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man

    The narrator in a figurative sense is reborn in chapter 11 after an accident that has robbed him of his memory, ability to speak and his identity. The machinery and music combine to make a noise that resembles a woman in labor.

  2. Stopped by Woods on a Snowy Evening vs. The Collar.

    It's almost as if he feels a constant pressure to keep going, to keep busy and that he does not have time to admire the woods. The speaker's role in the story portrays an incessant need to do something in order to make his life a valid and productive one.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work