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Does television make religion seem good or bad? What kind of influence does television have?

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Introduction

This piece of coursework is on how media represents religion. Does television make religion seem good or bad? What kind of influence does television have? Since 1946 religious programmes have started to come on television such as 'songs of praise'. These programmes are known as God Slots. In class we watched two different programmes. The first program we watched was Mr. Bean goes to church, shown on BBC 2. Mr. Bean enters the church while a hymn is being sung. He does not know the words to the hymn, and so has to borrow a hymnbook, from the person next to him. Mr. Bean has no clue as to what is going on. Mr. Bean finds church particularly boring as he soon falls asleep. This particular episode of Mr. Bean makes religion seem boring and uninteresting. It represents religion in a bad way. The second program we watched was The Vicar Of Dibley, shown on both BBC 1 and Channel 4. First of all we see the vicar decorating a Christmas tree along with another lady. The two of them are talking about the sermons the vicar had given the year before. The vicar is very enthusiastic about the birth of Jesus, Son of God. ...read more.

Middle

I asked a religious Muslim person for their point of view about this program and they agreed with me. The television program we watched about worship was Songs of Praise, shown on Sunday on BBC 1 or BBC 2. The length is 40 minutes. We watched two episodes of songs of praise so we could compare them. The first one we watched was celebrating the 40th anniversary of the program itself. It was set in Wimbledon where the tennis was held. There were about 10,000 people in the audience all singing along. Anyone who was watching that episode at home or somewhere else could easily join in as there were subtitles shown. The music and the mood of the audience were very happy and upbeat. It wasn't like normal hymns. There was a curtain structure that was held it was hymn, interview, hymn, and interview. I do not think this particular show of songs of praise had a particular age group at which it was aimed. I think the target audience was basically anyone was Christian and religious. The pace they went at was quite fast, and so they got through a lot in just one 40-minute program. However it was not too fast. ...read more.

Conclusion

He was completely against the idea of abortion. Later on that day there was some sort off party going on where the priest had been invited. The priest was trying to comfort and calm down Edal's mum. The priest said, "What is done is done. You can't go back and change it now," to Edal's mum. After a while the priest goes over to Edal (who is very upset) to try and calm her down. This time the priest said to Edal " God won't hate you because you had an abortion." He also suggests she should go to the church to ask for forgiveness. Another thing the priest says to Edal is "when you are ready I want to hear your confession." He also adds " the baby had a right to live." As you can tell there was an awfully big issue going on in Brookside at that time. The target audience for this program is quite a wide range of people, from teenagers all the way up to old aged pensioners. The program was very interesting even if you had never watched Brookside before. I think this program shows religion in a good way. Some people might also think this program is good. Other people may not like the fact that abortion is being discussed. They may not want their children to watch the program. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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