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Euthanasia - assisted suicide.

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Introduction

Assignment One EUTHANASIA Communication Skills C1150 SUMMARY According to recent research based on the death of patients with terminally ill cancer, it has been found that families tend to deal with the stress and grief of the death better if their loved ones die by euthanasia in comparison to those who die naturally. The research conducted in the Netherlands, asked family members and close friends about signs relating to depression, grief and post-traumatic stress due to the death. The research consisted of 510 people who had lost a family member or a close friend in the duration of 1992-1999. Questionnaires were sent to 316 people who lost someone as a result of natural cause and 189 people who lost someone as a result of euthanasia. The research found that family or friends of the patients who died as a result of euthanasia had less distressing symptoms than that the family or friends of patients who died a natural death. Researchers say the results were due to the fact that family members and close friends were able to be more prepared for the death. They had the chance to say their goodbyes, which in the case of natural death was not always possible. ...read more.

Middle

[ref.Web1] Richard Chinn, a hospital worker saw great purple grape-like masses hanging on the chin of a patient who had been diagnosed with cancer, the masses being cancerous growth. Whenever the patient would eat, the food was collected in the cancerous tumour. When the tumour was as large as a tennis ball, the doctors would amputate it. However this was just a continuous process. The patient was not at ease and requested for euthanasia. He was told the word "NO" by the doctors and the courts. According to Chinn the patient eventually came down with pneumonia; he was not revived and passed away. If euthanasia were legalised, then the patient would have been able to end the pain earlier. Jack Kevorkian, was convicted of first-degree murder, in March 1999. The retired pathologist will spend 10-25 years in prison. He injected a deadly medicine into a man named Thomas Youk. Kevorkian also assisted several other unfortunate people die condition being they took the drugs themselves. His actions were illegal, but is the idea of ending suffering wrong? [ref. Web2] Oregon, a state of America has legalised euthanasia, however guidelines have been set. The main one being that procedure of euthanasia must be requested by the patient and that they should take the deadly dosage themselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

[ref. Web2 ] By looking at the support of both sides of the discussion it seems that the arguments against euthanasia outweighs the arguments for legalisation. There are consequences that can arise if euthanasia is legalised, such as doctors abusing their power, new medicines being found and people encouraging it due to financial gains are far too great to chance. Referring back to the article, which determines how strong the symptoms of grief and stress are, it may make it easier for the families and close friends. But is it fair to persuade the patients to end their lives? Given the chance that new medicines could cure them and give them a chance to lead a normal life. Eliminating the people facing the problems cannot solve the problems. The more difficult and humane solution to human suffering is to address the problems. Software Comptons Complete Reference Collection Publisher: Comptons Complete Reference Collection the learning company {ref. Soft1} Websites BBC � Health � Euthanasia grief less severe Article published 24th July 2003 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3092905.stm [Accessed 31st October 2003] {ref. Web1} BBC � Health � US mercy killing 'not a crime' Article published 23rd March 1999 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/301020.stm [Accessed article 1st November 2003] {ref. Web2} Books WORDSWORTH REFERENCE � The Wordsworth Encyclopaedia Published 1995 � Volume 2 chubu-grig � Page 765 {ref. Book1} Nadia Ullah Information Mathematics 2nd November 2003 - 1 - ...read more.

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