• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain how Christians apply these beliefs to Abortion and Euthanasia, showing you understand different points of view.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Abortion and Euthanasia A02: Explain how Christians apply these beliefs to Abortion and Euthanasia, showing you understand different points of view. Christians apply many different beliefs about abortion and euthanasia, although they may have many different points of view, it is understandable to why they hold certain beliefs and apply them in Christianity. Euthanasia and abortion are two very sensitive issues of which there are strong arguments for and against. Some Christians believe that these two practices are totally wrong and should never be carried out while other Christians, for varying reasons believe euthanasia and abortion are acceptable and even in some cases, the right thing to do. There are many different ways that Christianity applies its beliefs on abortion, here are some of them: The different views/beliefs of abortion The Roman Catholic belief is that even while the baby is still very tiny and still hardly developed the baby growing in the womb is the beginning of a human life, and another human being should not end any life created by God at any stage of its development. All life is precious as the psalm quote below states that: Another human being should not end any life created by God at any stage of its development. All life is precious as the psalmist says 'you created every part of me, you put me together in my Mothers womb... ...read more.

Middle

Our beliefs in the value of life influenced by the church also affect the way we see euthanasia. There are two types of euthanasia. Voluntary or active euthanasia is when the person concerned asked someone else to help them die. They may persuade another person to assist them to die or they may refuse the medical treatment necessary to keep them alive. Passive/involuntary euthanasia is when the person concerned is no longer in a condition where they can make a decision for themselves. The decision to bring about the death is taken by relatives or medical experts. The different views/beliefs of euthanasia "Naked I came from my mother's womb, naked I shall return again. Yahweh gave, Yahweh has taken back. Blessed be the name of Yahweh!" Job 1:21 This quote shows the basis of Christian belief that God gives life and that he can only take our lives away when we return to him. The Quaker view is quoted as "We do not set down rules, we offer a process for working out the decision that is right for each individual person" The Roman Catholic Church opposes passive euthanasia that is when artificial means of sustaining life are either not offered or are withdrawn. The actual teaching, which informs both of these points of view, this is the Roman Catholic Church's belief about the Sanctity of life. ...read more.

Conclusion

People who are brainless and have no hope of recovering consciousness but whose bodies are still technically alive. A person may reach a point where his or her life is not worth living and they wish to die. These apply to people whose minds are so deteriorated that they are helpless and unable to live with any dignity at all and they aren't really living a 'life'. God has given people dominion over living. Stopping suffering is a loving thing to do. Exit advocates a change in the law to allow the judiciary greater flexibility concerning euthanasia. They closely examine statements by politicians. They advise on living wills and are legal in the court of law. They promote euthanasia and advise legal acceptance of euthanasia. Most Christians do not think euthanasia is right thing to do, because nearly all denominations of Christianity do not support it. The Roman Catholic Church absolutely condemns it and in 1975 The Church of England produced a report "On Dying Well" which opposed euthanasia. The Methodist Church does not promote euthanasia either, but it is debatable as to whether Christians should follow the beliefs of their church. Different denominational beliefs about euthanasia have arisen from the leaders and is therefore very much a matter of opinion-as the Bible does not refer to it Christianity as a whole cannot say whether it is religiously wrong or right. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ritatsu Thomas 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Euthanasia section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Euthanasia essays

  1. My hypothesis: Euthanasia should be legalized in the UK.I am going to answer a ...

    He lost both his legs out there, and back in those days there was not much anyone could do! How did he cope with this? He managed fine for two years, however he was never happy. He was a sporty person, and realised his quality of life had gone right down.

  2. What is meant by euthanasia?

    The majority of the interviewees were Christian because I want to find out how Christians would respond to questions concerning euthanasia. But I also asked people of other religions so that I can get a more varied view. (4)

  1. “An acceptance of the practice ofvoluntary euthanasia is incompatible with Christian belief in the ...

    There are four main characteristics of the Christian Sanctity of Life argument, voiced in the Bible. The first is the image of God. Christian anthropology regards every human being as created in the image and likeness of God. To be created in God's image implies that humans are set apart

  2. eChristians must never support euthanasia.f Do you agree? Give reasons to support your answer ...

    These Christians argue that the unnecessary prolongation of life is as morally wrong as the premature ending of life, because personality, dignity and well-being are just as important as, if not more important than, biological survival. The central Christian principle of agape ('Love thy neighbour as thyself')

  1. Is Euthanasia morally acceptable?

    I think on the whole my research has presented what I wanted to find out and in fact given me extra in some cases but in others it has not worked so well mostly. The question on religion is not very representative because I mostly have answers from Christians and

  2. Euthanasia in the catholic church.

    That is taking a human life that could be cured. 3.0 POSITION OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH 3.1 Statement by the Church on Euthanasia The Catholic Church believes that the life we are living does not belong to us, but to God to give it to us.

  1. Choose a case which you consider to be of crucial importance for medical ethics ...

    In relation to assisted suicide it is the suicide act 1961 that makes such an act illegal, and is why the case of Pretty v United Kingdom is so important in my opinion. This case distinguishes the accepted legal role that euthanasia can play in society and medical law, distinguishing passive euthanasia from active euthanasia.

  2. The benefits of euthanasia to Christians

    charity Naomi House Hospice and comes into school to do talks and presentations about euthanasia. If you don't want to work for The Hospice you could work for a different charity, there are loads of them. For example; the charity Life.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work