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Explain The Cosmological Argument

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Introduction

Explain The Cosmological Argument From Aquinas and Copleston The Cosmological Argument has been put forward by two different men; St. Thomas Aquinas and Frederick Copleston. The Cosmological Argument is both inductive and a posteriori. This means that the end conclusion relies on probability and chance, rather than any proof from the premises, and the argument is based on observations and experience from noticing change, particularly in nature. The main layout of the Cosmological Argument is that everything in the universe has a cause for its existence. The universe exists, therefore the universe must have a cause for it coming into being, this cause being God. Both Aquinas and Leibniz use Ockham's Razor, 'do not multiply entities unnecessarily', to state that God is the most likely probable creator of the universe, as it is the simplest explanation. ...read more.

Middle

The object causing this 'push' in movement is also given motion by another object. According to Aquinas, infinite regress is logically impossible, and because of this there must be something at the beginning which caused this motion, without being affected itself. This is God. Aquinas says that God must be an uncaused causer, because if God were the efficient cause, and physically giving the object a 'push', rather than being The Final Cause, the 'push' would affect God, meaning it would be contingent rather than necessary. To help explain this argument of motion, Aquinas uses the idea of dominoes. One force knocking domino causes the whole line of them to fall. For the objects to go from Potentiality to Actuality there needs to be something in the beginning which has already possessed Actuality. ...read more.

Conclusion

This means it would be impossible for the first thing to ever come into existence. Something necessary (needs to exist, and doesn't rely on anything to exist) must have existed in the beginning to bring the contingent objects into existence. This necessary being is God. The other man to put forward a different version of the Cosmological Argument was Frederick Copleston. In 1948, Copleston and Russell had a live debate on the radio concerning the universe and the Cosmological Argument. Copleston stated his argument in three different stages: everything within universe has contingency. Because of this, the universe as a whole has got to be contingent. This premise is known as the Fallacy of Composition; jumping from everything within the universe being contingent to the universe itself being contingent. For the contingency of the universe and everything within it to have come into it, a necessary being must have created it. This being is God. ...read more.

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