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Explain the theory of Virtue Ethics.

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Introduction

Laura Barrett > Explain the theory of Virtue Ethics Aristotle originally introduced virtue Ethics to society in ancient Greek times. Virtue Ethics tells us that we should look at the character of the person instead of the actions or duties a person performs. Many moral theories work out what the right or good thing to do is. They convey that a set of principles for working out the best choice. Virtue theory rejects the moral theories that suggest that there are no moral laws and when moral statements are simply emotive expressions. Virtue theory provides an alternative route for drawing on the tradition of moral philosophy in a way that's different from the other theories. Rather than looking for rules, it looks at the fundamental issue of what it means to be human. Additionally virtue ethics concentrates on what the right thing to do. In addition it implies on how you can be a better person. It is about defining good people and the qualities that make them good. The roots of virtue theory are mainly in the Greek philosopher Aristotle. Aristotle argues that "whenever we do something, we do it to gain an end, and that ultimate end of all ends is the chief good, the greatest good." ...read more.

Middle

Keenan summaries virtue theory in three questions, "Who am I? Who ought I become? How do I get there?" Virtues provide a way of estimating a character, and suggest a direction in which you should go in order to become a better person. Virtue theory is person centered and focused on our development. By knowing this and understanding ourselves, we can practice to be better. Keenan recently suggested improving these theories for the modern day: prudence, justice, fidelity, self-care and the individual Christian virtue of mercy. These are backed up by three theological virtues, faith, charity and hope. MacIntyre sees a moral society as one in which people recongise commonly agreed virtues and aspire to meet them. MacIntyre argues that modern ethics has lost sight of its roots and has forgotten all that has gone before. The virtues improve and clarify themselves over time. He express that virtues is an acquired human quality the possession and exercise of which tends to enable us to achieve those goods which are internal to practices and the lack of which effectively prevents us from achieving any such goods. In a way virtue ethics is about an individual seeking to develop a vision for their life. ...read more.

Conclusion

Alternatively a situationist would look at the circumstances and might come to the conclusion that the most loving thing to do would have an abortion as it may let the girl to grow up in the way that she would have been allowed to and in time might forget about the rape. In conclusion personally I believe Moral relativist theories are too vague to be useful guides to decision making as decision making is common sense because from a young age we have been taught what is good and evil. But how people perceive what is good and what is evil and how to we come to know which is which is not decided as many people have different perceptions on it. In many circumstances though many people think it is best to let their passions to guide to whatever they want. I consider that there's a common sense that there are some things that are just wrong and can never be right on any grounds. A believed loving end could justify actions that many other people think it is simply wrong. BIBLOGRAPHY www.ask.co.uk - then the links that were provided www.yahoo.co.uk - then the links that were provided "Ethical Studies" by Robert A Bowie Class notes ...read more.

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