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Jewish Festivals. Explain the importance for Jews of Rosh Hashanah and its customs.

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Introduction

Festivals Essay A) Explain the importance for Jews of Rosh Hashanah and its customs. Rosh Hashanah and the customs that accompany the festival are important for Jews because of many reasons. Rosh Hashanah is a time for men and women to review their deeds of the year and analyse what exactly they've done bad. It is the 'anniversary' of the creation of Man and is the chance to look over the year, just as people do in many occupations to see how the year has been. It is particularly important for Jews as it's a time to rid of their sins and receive forgiveness from God. Jews blow the shofar in order to help assemble all the acts they need forgiveness for. The first note blown is tekia which means gathering. It gathers all the actions of the year. This is followed by a teruah (disbanding) which then breaks the actions down into much smaller pieces. ...read more.

Middle

Explain how Yom Kippur might affect the life and beliefs of a Jew. Yom Kippur might affect the life and beliefs of a Jew in a few ways. Yom Kippur is the chance for Jews to start a new beginning. If a Jew had done something in which they regret, or had sinned and couldn't forgive themselves for it, Yom Kippur is formal forgiveness from God. Jews beliefs may be affected by Yom Kippur by learning a lesson that God indirectly shows. God knows that without forgiveness, the world could not exist and run smoothly. That's why he created the festival of Yom Kippur. Seeing God implement such a lesson teaches Jews that we must learn to forgive, and that every relationship, including ours with God, must involve forgiveness. Yom Kippur could make a Jew hopeful as it shows God is there for them, and so may increase the life quality of a Jew. ...read more.

Conclusion

We should be striving to be perfect, as God would like the world to be, and so removing the bad deeds we're doing helps work towards this annual target. If Jews were to review their life every day, or at shorter periods rather than annually, they would lose site of the main target as it becomes a chore to meet them. Setting too many targets and reviewing ourselves constantly would be unmanageable and Jews wouldn't stick to it. Reviewing once a year enables us to concentrate on being our best. On the other hand, some may say we shouldn't spend a day thinking about what we've done wrong. Some think that the past is the past and we should live for the future. Also, they believe reviewing what we do in a bad way will only demoralise and dishearten us instead of making us improve and rid of them. Therefore, we shouldn't review ourselves at all. In comparison, some think we should review ourselves everyday in order to uphold a life full of good happenings. ...read more.

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