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Knowledge and Understanding of belief and practise The Sacrament of Holy Communion Forms Part of Worship for Most Christians

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Introduction

GCSE RS COURSEWORK Knowledge and Understanding of belief and practise The Sacrament of Holy Communion Forms Part of Worship for Most Christians In the Oxford dictionary Holy Communion is defined as: 'The service of Christian worship at which bread and wine are consecrated and shared also known as the Eucharist' The bible establishes that Holy Communion is what Christ himself did at the Last Supper. As narrated by St. Matthew, firstly Jesus offered the apostles what he was going to change, and then he offered them the bread and wine and then gave them Communion. And while they were at supper, Jesus took bread and blessed and broke and gave it to His disciples and said, "Take you and eat, this is my Body." And taking the chalice He gave thanks and gave it to them saying, "Drink you all of this. For this is my Blood of the New Testament which shall be shed for many unto remission of sins." (Matthew 26:26-28) In the Jenkins Christianity Textbook a sacrament is defined as 'The visible form of an invisible grace' all sacraments involve some kind of physical elements. ...read more.

Middle

The Protestant tradition rejects this view on the grounds that Jesus made his sacrifice once and for all on the cross and cannot be sacrificed again, as he is now in glory. So the Eucharist is just in memory of this event and it is by recreating the event that Christians remember the importance of Christ's life and death and resurrection. There are differences in emphasis between Christian denominations in respect of the Eucharist. For Roman Catholics the Eucharistic service, known as the mass, is the very center of their worship, and members of the Roman Catholic Church are obliged to take communion at least once a year. Active Roman Catholics take it weekly or even daily. Daily communion is less common in other denominations, but weekly communion is known in the Anglican and several other churches. In the Jenkins Christianity Textbook a sacrament is defined as 'The visible form of an invisible grace' all sacraments involve some kind of physical elements. These physical and visible elements represent spiritual and invisible things like the bread and wine in the Eucharist which represent the body and blood of Jesus Christ. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the Anglican church the bread is received while in the kneeling position, it is received from the paten which is where the bread is kept. The Wine is mixed with holy water from the baptism's and then drank from a chalice. They believe in consubstantiation which is the belief that the body and blood of Jesus Christ are mysteriously and supernaturally united with the bread and wine. The ministry of the sacrament then takes place, this is centred on the words and actions of Jesus at the Last Supper when he took the bread and wine, gave thanks over them, broke the bread and shared the bread and wine with all of his disciples. Then service is ended with the great thanksgiving, then the communion and then the dismissal takes place. The Baptist church does not take communion weekly however they follow the same structure as the Anglican church. However they call the Lords meal the Breaking of the Bread. They receive the bread while remaining seating and the wine they receive is non alcoholic. In conclusion Holy communion is taken seriously by many communities. The Lord's supper although it is done differently within all communities it has the same meaning to all people. ...read more.

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