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"Mort Aux Chats" - A poem by Peter Porter What is the poem about?

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"Mort Aux Chats" - A poem by Peter Porter What is the poem about? "Mort aux chats" is a carefully crafted poem, well disguised and veiled. We cannot, therefore, be 100% certain of Porter's intentions when he was writing the poem. However, what is certain is that Porter is talking about intense power, influence and evil, which he wants us to know more about through studying his poem thoroughly. At that point, Porter is aiming to be a witness for his race, realising that maybe he is guilty of prejudice too and regretting, while attempting to drive the reader to confess and repent for the crimes he/she may have committed as well. "When I dream of God I see a massacre of Cats." Prejudice and vices will always prevail in society; otherwise, everything said or done would be useless, without any purpose. ...read more.


"Unbearably fond of the moon" intends to represent religious prejudice against atheists or people who are superstitious and worship the moon. The atheist is cautioned; he/she is unbearable to the prejudiced person. This idea follows on from "Cats were worshipped in decadent societies (Egypt and Ancient Rome), also in the 1st stanza. The prejudiced person takes paganism as an insult to God and bursts his anger by saying 'decadent'. Another form of prejudice proved in the poem is of huge division, partiality and disgraceful treatment to the lower social group. "Cats sit down to pee (our scientists have proved it)" is a very ironic quote. It is portraying prejudice against the poorest and lowest class who are looked as at inhuman and isolated from other humans. 'Our' creates a distinct sense of selfishness possibly between the West and East. ...read more.


The characteristic of the poem suggests hatred to the world of cats: this is a very insignificant and futile point unless the poet has a motive behind this usage of metaphor. The cat is not only acting as a fa´┐Żade for one person, but is for several types of evil and prejudice. The relationship between the cat and prejudice intends to make the message of the poem concealed from the readers' eyes. This enhances the effectiveness of the poem. The reader can also work out for himself the different kinds of prejudices, which can widen his viewpoint and make him think longer about the issue. I think the poet's most powerful and effective technique was that he never mentioned anything against the prejudiced person; he was biased against the victim of the prejudice throughout. This exactly got over the message of the poet through to the reader. ...read more.

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